no eggs in winter

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Max0106, Oct 15, 2015.

  1. Max0106

    Max0106 New Egg

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    Sep 17, 2015
    Kent, England
    Hi, can anybody tell me what time of year chickens stop laying eggs? This will be my first winter keeping chickens and they have already slowed right down. I am in the UK and 3 weeks ago we were getting about 13 hours of light a day, now its more like 10.5 or 11. In those 3 weeks i have wormed them and introduced a new pullet (she is all settled in now) so i just want to make sure that have slowed down because of the time of year and not because they are stressed. Also what time of year do they start laying again with no artificial light? BTW we are getting about 1 egg every other day from 3 chickens, 3 weeks ago we were getting 2 or 3 a day Thanks
     
  2. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2015
    I use fluorescent lighting on a timer; spring year around and the hens lay all year. I have not even noticed much of a slow down during molt. As to your question, if your hens were laying good with 13 hours of daylight then figure when your days will return to 13 hours.
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    They need a minimum of about 12 hours to keep laying.
    Probably a combination of the new bird, the worming and the change in light.
    If you wormed, depending on what you used, you may not be able to eat eggs for several weeks anyway.
    How old are your birds?

    Beware the old fluorescent tube ballasts can have a flicker rate that messes with their eyes, not in a good way.

    Sometimes first year layers will lay all winter without supplemental lighting, sometimes they won't.
    Older layers need 14-16 hours of light to lay regularly thru winter. Last winter I used a 40 watt incandescent light(this year I am using a CFL) that comes on early in the morning to provide 14-15 hours of light and they go to roost with the natural sundown. Last year I started the lighting increase a bit late(mid October), the light should be increased slowly, and the pullets didn't start laying until late December. Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting. Some folks think that using lighting shortens the years a hen will lay, I don't agree with that theory but I also plan to cull my older hens for soup at about 3 years old.
     
  4. Max0106

    Max0106 New Egg

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    Sep 17, 2015
    Kent, England
    thanks. what light fitting do you use and how do you get power to it? i would like one i can just plug in to an outside pull socket. also how much light do they need? confused [​IMG]
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    You need a timer and power out in the coop for just a regular light socket...light duration should be ramped up slowly.
    Read the linked article in my post.
     
  6. Max0106

    Max0106 New Egg

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    Sep 17, 2015
    Kent, England
    thanks, do i need a heat lamp as well or is it just the light i need?
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Chickens need white light bright enough to see to eat, drink, move about.

    I do not heat my coop...ever.
     

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