No supplemental heat in CO?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by SarahKing, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. SarahKing

    SarahKing New Egg

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    Dec 4, 2011
    I have 6 adult chickens in Denver. They have a large barnyard and a large daytime shelter. Their nighttime coop is quite small (about 7 square feet). They rest in thick straw bedding, and the coop is pretty draft-free.

    Most winter nights in Denver are in the low teens, but we do get nights in the single digits and even occasionally a couple of degrees below zero. Most of my friends with chickens use supplemental heat in winter, although I do know one person who doesn't.

    I'm debating whether it's really necessary to put in the supplemental heat this year, and I'd like to hear from other people who are raising small flocks in similar-ish climates. Do you think the chickens can burrow in their straw and keep each other warm, or is it just too cold for that in Denver?

    Many thanks.
     
  2. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    No heat needed and they will fare better without having to constantly fluctuate temps as they move back and forth between inside and outside.
     
  3. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in Alamosa....we compete with Gunnison for coldest temps!

    No heat in my coop....we hit minus zero last night....no heat...they do fine.
     
  4. hispoptart

    hispoptart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We're in Rangely, -3 this morning and no heat. This is my first year with them, but I am sticking with the no heat gang. To many things can go wrong by adding heat.
     
  5. mtngrl812

    mtngrl812 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have not used any heat yet, I live in Bloomfield, NM and it was 12 this AM but I noticed what looks like frostbite on on hens crown. I am concerned that my little coop might keep too much moisture from chicken breath in the coop which caused the frostbite. I was on here looking for more of the same info. I had thought about using on of those heating pads for dog kennels in the coop, just to help dry out the moisture.
    Hope there is a little more info added to this thread. I am going to continue searching for more.
     
  6. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:they are warm enough...too much moisture....they need ventilation in the coop....try not shutting up the door at night...I have a couple with a tad of frostbite also...
     
  7. hispoptart

    hispoptart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:If your concerned about moisture then you may want to take a look at how much ventilation you have in your coop. I hear thats the best way to help with moisture.
     
  8. mtngrl812

    mtngrl812 Chillin' With My Peeps

    last night was the first time I closed the pop door of the coop. They are in a coop that is in a closed in run, so I don't usually close the pop door. Last night I thought I would be nice a help keep them cozy.... maybe that was such a good idea. [​IMG]
     
  9. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    It was -27F here last night, and it'll get colder before January. When I opened the door all the birds ran out like they always do. They are much better at withstanding cold temps then we give them credit for. As the temp lowers they will get a down coat to keep themselves warm.
     
  10. ShelleyN

    ShelleyN Out Of The Brooder

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    It doesn't matter what the temps are OUTSIDE roost, I would think it's what's INSIDE that matters. My three girls roost in a cage in our garage, so there's not a lot of snuggling going on, especially with two of them picking on one and she has to distance herself sometimes. This morning the thermometer IN their cage read 29 degrees-- about 20 degrees warmer than outside temps--and their water was frozen. Outside humidity is in the upper 70s% overnight, but I have no idea if that's a lot or a little for them compared to everyone else. The forecast is -2 tonight, so I suspect it will be about 20 in their cage. Is that a deal breaker?
     

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