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Noisy Chickens - Afraid Neighbors will complain

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Megan81159, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. Megan81159

    Megan81159 Out Of The Brooder

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    For the most part, my girls were pretty quiet. Some clucking now and then and the occasional false predator alarm sqwuak, but otherwise what I expected. However, in the past few months (they're around 2 years old now) they've been going crazy in the mornings. From 7-12, they'll give short, sporadic concerts. Their vocalization seem to be mostly egg songs (cluck cluck cluck PAKAAAH), but I thought they only sang those before and/or after they lay an egg. However from 7-12, they sing the egg song intermittently at least 4 times, and they don't even lay an egg. They don't even go in the nesting box. There are also the shrill clucks/screams when a predator is around, but 95% of the time when my girls scream there is no predator around. Also, most of these alarmed screams come from just one or two of my girls and not the whole flock, and when I go out to see them, they usually stop when they see me. It's getting to the point where I'm very scared that the neighbors will get my girls kicked out of the neighborhood. I'm also planning on building a run (they free range now). Will their sudden shortage of space increase the noise? Please advise!
     
  2. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First are hens legal where you are? How close are the neighbors? Are you on speaking terms with them?
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
  3. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    We falsely associate said 'song' with laying eggs, it's not per say an egg laying song at all it's actually a locator 'beacon' throwback to their wild days... In the wild a hen would 'disappear' from the flock to go lay eggs, and they would use said song as a beacon call back to the flock, other chickens (especially roosters) in the flock will answer back, allowing them to stay connected and rejoin each other...
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
  4. BruceAZ

    BruceAZ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Valley of the Sun :)
    7-12 ?

    at that time most people are already awake and readying for work around here.. so i might be able to get away with it

    sounds like your chickens do not like being alone..

    well.. if they are free ranging and now being put into a closed off space.. maybe.

    put something in the run to keep them busy

    like a chicken swing or bale of straws or hang their treats in a container where they can peck it.. keep them busy by providing things that they can do while in the run

    watch this video

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
  5. Megan81159

    Megan81159 Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes, they are legal and don't require a permit provided you have less than 6. We live in a cul-de-sac, so the neighbors are right next to us. We are on speaking terms with maybe 3 of them, the rest not so much.
     
  6. Megan81159

    Megan81159 Out Of The Brooder

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    The problem is when they do it on the weekends when people sleep in. Also, the one that is the most vocal is the most submissive/bullied chicken, meaning that I tend to spoil her and hold her the most. I don't suppose a run will make her feel more secure, would it? Thanks for the boredom busters!
     
  7. Megan81159

    Megan81159 Out Of The Brooder

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    Also, they free range in our rather large backyard (around 2x bigger than the average, one-story, middle-class house). However, it's not like a giant field or anything. They will however have to get used to being in just a dirt and weeds area as opposed to where they forage around now (which includes flower beds, concrete areas, lawn area, and fresh dirt areas).
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    When you build that run, you can put a deep mulch in it. You can use coop bedding, lawn clippings (from untreated lawns) leaves, garden refuse, hay or straw, wood chips (like from a tree service company) and any other materials that you would normally put into a compost bin. You might even find a supply of used stable litter to spike it up a bit. Your goal should be to get a layer of mulch about 6" deep. I guarantee you will have the sweetest smelling run in the county. Then, when you want the girls to be quiet, toss a couple of cups of scratch into that mulch. They will be too busy searching out every single grain to bother with being noisy. A side benefit: Your run will be covered with a healthy, active, working compost that will promote development of good bacteria and fungus that will feed the soil and also feed the gut flora of your chickens to build a healthy immunity and digestive system. It will also attract beneficial insects and worms that will feed your flock. It will keep your run from turning into a dust bowl or a mud pit, and give them plenty of healthy areas to dust bathe. And, you will have a ready supply of black gold: healthy compost that you can use in your gardens, and even share with your neighbors. You might even work out a trade with them: have them bring you their clean (no herbicides/insecticides) yard refuse all year in trade for a bag of finished compost in the spring.
     

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