Non-Broody Breeds

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by TeaChick, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. TeaChick

    TeaChick Overrun With Chickens

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    In my search for a non-broody bantam breed, I have found that information on broody hens is much easier to come by than non-broody breeds.
    So, I thought I could start a thread and we could compile a list or two of non-broody breeds, then others looking for non-broody breeds could find the list easily.

    I will start a list of non-broody bantams and non-broody LF breeds. Then, as people add breeds to this thread, I'll edit them into my lists as long as the site lets me edit, then I'll start editing other posts of mine on the first page to add more as they're added to the thread.

    The purpose of this thread is to share information, experience, stories, pictures and anything else you would like to about non-broody breeds of chickens. Sharing experience and information is important! =)

    Non-Broody LF (b) = also in bantam
    Leghorn (b)
    Rhode Island Red / RIR (b)
    Wyandotte (b)
    Minorca
    Ancona
    Barnevelder
    Rock (infrequently)
    Blue Andalusian
    Chantecler (infrequently)
    Polish
    Egyptian Fayoumis
    German Spitzhauben/Appenzeller
    Golden Campine
    Lakenvelder
    Sicilian Buttercup
    Hamburg
    Sultan
    Ameraucanas
    Catalanas
    Crevecoeurs
    La Fleche
    Orloffs
    Phoenix
    Redcaps
    Sumatras
    White Faced Black Spanish
    Yokohamas.


    Non-Broody Bantams
    Leghorn
    Rhode Island Red
    Wyandotte



    Sex-links are a special case. They are not non-broody per se. The broodiness of a sex-linked hen depends upon the breeds mixed to achieve the link. Mostly, sex-links are bred for production, thus breeding out broodiness usually. I have two red/gold sex-links that, if I allow them to collect a clutch, they will go broody, but as long as I collect their eggs, they don't go broody, but if I don't leave them at least one egg, they'll start a new nest and hide eggs on me.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014
  2. TeaChick

    TeaChick Overrun With Chickens

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    I will continue to do research and edit the lists.

    Just please look farther down this page to see where breeds have been added to the lists, as the site will only allow me to edit my posts a specific number of times.

    Also, please feel free to add breeds to the thread and I'll edit them into my lists.
    And please feel free to post and ask about specific breeds and we'll get you all the information, experience, etc. that we can. =)
     
  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Thanks for the list.
    I have very little experience with bantams but lots of experience with Penedesencas (blacks). I get about 30% go broody. Sometimes almost half. I had 10 pullets sharing a community nest and 8 went broody together, another came and went so only one of the 10 showed no tendency.

    I've had white and black LF Leghorns. A black hen raised many broods for me.

    The only other broodies I've had among about 30+ breeds were Orps, Ameraucanas and a Columbian Wyandotte Frizzle.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  4. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    More non-broody LF additions should include Anconas, Ameraucanas, Catalanas, Crevecoeurs, La Fleche, Orloffs, Phoenix, Redcaps, Sumatras, White Faced Black Spanish, and Yokohamas.
     
  5. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    P.S. I know that at least a few of these are available in bantam sizes, but how many of them are I don't know.
     
  6. TeaChick

    TeaChick Overrun With Chickens

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    Thanks!!!
    I was trying to be conservative originally, the only sources I had were hatchery websites and they conflict on some breeds, so I was being careful.
    Thank you for sharing your experience and knowledge.


    Same here. [​IMG]



    =)
    Would 30% be considered non-broody?
    I think I have a Leghorn who occasionally pretends that she's practicing; she'll spend like 3 hours in the nest for a few days in a row, then she goes back to taking only about 30 min to lay. [​IMG] If she every went broody, then I'd know that I'm the one who has the only broody Leghorn in the county. lol

    Thank you so much for sharing your experience!!!
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I think 30% would qualify as a broody breed. That's more than I ever got with orps.
     
  8. TeaChick

    TeaChick Overrun With Chickens

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    List updated. [​IMG]
     
  9. TeaChick

    TeaChick Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh, okay. I'll remove them from the list.
    I feel like 50% is way too much, but 30% seemed like it was on a line. KWIM?
    Yeah, if a breed is more broody than Orps, then it's definitely broody! lol

    PS: One of the hatchery sites that I was looking at yesterday said Australorps go broody and another said they don't. Neither of them said they were in-between, just "yes" and "no".
    Do you know or know someone who knows?
     
  10. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    I've raised Black Australorps for years and it seems to depend on the strain. I've purchased BA chicks from four different hatcheries and the ones from Cackle were the broodiest and the poorest layers as a result. The ones I've gotten from Dunlap Hatchery rarely go broody and some of them lay over 300 eggs per year. Ideal Poultry and Murray McMurray have been down the middle in both broodiness and egg production.
     

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