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Non-insulated coop questions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by FriendlyFlyer, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. FriendlyFlyer

    FriendlyFlyer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Hi, my 8x10 coop is home to my 9 (almost adult) chickens, who layed their first egg today by the way! It is starting to get cold outside and I'm getting worried. I know chickens come with their own technics for staying warm but I worry since my coop is not insulated. I know they say not to give them heat because it will mess them up, so what can I do? I know for a fact that without insulation the coop will only be a few degrees warmer than the temp outside. If it gets to -20 those poor birds might just freeze to death. Can you help me please? Thank you!
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    This an inside shot, and you can see no insulation. Just the sheathing under the siding. Our barn is 20x24 and 12' high at the peak. There is no way to heat it if I wanted to. It is specifically designed for ventilation flow under the roof. The eaves are open at the bottom and at the top to allow air to flow.

    We had over 40 nights below zero last winter. We had -30 at the worst, yet my hens were just fine. All I can do is show you photos of real live birds, living in a real live barn, with no heat, in subzero weather. You'll have to come to your own conclusions and do what you think is best.
    Best regards from the 45th parallel, half way to the North Pole. [​IMG]

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  3. 2overeasy000

    2overeasy000 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm at the 42nd with no insulation and we were fine here too. My coop averaged about 10 degrees warmer inside. I did add an extra bag of shavings and fed a warm breakfast(just hot water and layer pellets) on really cold days.
     
  4. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 19, 2011
    Massachusetts, USA
    As Freds HEns alluded to, ventilation is really very important to their well being in the winter. Fresh air in slowly and moisture laden air out the top. Simply warm air rises; and the air in the coop is exchanged. Hence, insulation isn't a big deal. Hens like other animals, adapt to the temps as they decrease. They adjust. Adequate food and water is important. ANd having wide roosts to protect their feet ( body can cover the entire foot on a flat roost).
     
  5. SteveBaz

    SteveBaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 6, 2011
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    This an inside shot, and you can see no insulation. Just the sheathing under the siding. Our barn is 20x24 and 12' high at the peak. There is no way to heat it if I wanted to. It is specifically designed for ventilation flow under the roof. The eaves are open at the bottom and at the top to allow air to flow.

    We had over 40 nights below zero last winter. We had -30 at the worst, yet my hens were just fine. All I can do is show you photos of real live birds, living in a real live barn, with no heat, in subzero weather. You'll have to come to your own conclusions and do what you think is best.

    We have folks from Alaska Minnesota and places that get real cold say the very same thing as quoted above by Fred.​
     
  6. krcote

    krcote Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Concord, NH
    Quote:We have folks from Alaska Minnesota and places that get real cold say the very same thing as quoted above by Fred.

    We too have a coop with no insulation, and it gets mighty cold here. We have never lost a bird to cold or frostbite.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2010
    NEK, VT
    No heat, no problems here. Proper ventilation on 45th parallel and wrap the run three sides in winter. And heated waterer is a must.

    One thing we do is ensure the pine shavings are clean (not frozen with waste) and give sunflower seed as winter treats (high in fat).

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    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  8. Rosaleen

    Rosaleen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Danville, Vermont
    Here in Northern Vermont we get some pretty severe winters. Plenty of ventilation and no drafts are the main ingredients in keeping you birds healthy. I have wrapped the sides of my run so the girls can go outside...they can come back in the coop anytime for food, water, and nesting boxes. Roosts are 2x4s so they van keep their tootsies warm. They all come in at dusk, sometimes even earlier, and the window gets locked.
     
  9. Bianca67

    Bianca67 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I too have been wondering the same things as we are beginning to build our first coop for use this spring. Thanks for the useful info.[​IMG]
     
  10. CherryChick

    CherryChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great pictures and great info!
     

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