Non-medicated feed? Whats the method?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Squishy, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. Squishy

    Squishy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2011
    Florida
    Trying to decide whether to feed medicated started or not... if you use un-medicated feed, what extra steps do you take?

    Sorry if this question is repetitive... my computer does not like the search feature (or other features). I've hatched and raised chicks with the help of this forum before, but it was almost two years ago so I only half remember what Im doing, LOL.
     
  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm using a good quality organic starter/grower this year. I'll give them a couple tablespoons of sugar in tepid water the first day with Gro-Gel and set some feed in the brooder. I'll give clear water the next day, then Vitamins-Electrolytes-Plus (1 Teaspoon per gallon of water) for three days. I'll do this for two weeks since my brooder has a wire floor and it will remain pretty sterile.

    The third week, I'll start 1 tsp Corid 9.6% per gallon of water 5 days a week. After a couple days of Corid in the water during that 3rd week, I'll take a few pinches of dirt from my chicken yard and let the chicks peck on it. Since they will go to the grow off pen on the fifth or sixth week, I will continue the Corid in the water until they are 8 weeks old.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2013
  3. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I forgot to mention that I will remain on watch for symptoms even after 8 weeks. The most critical time for cocci is between 4-16 weeks of age. Did you know those cocci oocysts can live up to 18 months in soil? Some people don't seem to have much trouble with it. I have migratory birds around my property and had a bout with it a few years ago where amprol wouldn't cure it. I had to run Sulfadimethoxine in the water to get rid of it. Luckily I had no losses because of it.
     
  4. jbs

    jbs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2011
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    I raised one batch of chicks organically (on unmedicated chick starter), and am working on my second. I found some tips on BYC for slowly exposing the chicks to the coccidia in the soil so they wouldn't get overwhelmed when I finally put them outside. As mentioned by Michael Apple, at week 2 or so I start putting a handful of soil into the brooder with the chicks. Then I'll slowly add more, I'll give them a clump of sod so they can dig it up and tear up the grass. The advice I've seen is to get the chicks outside as soon as possible, but my coop wasn't read with my first batch of chicks until they were 5-6 weeks old, so we built a pen outside that I could put them in for a few hours at a time. My problem now is that I'll be adding chicks to my existing flock, and I'm worried about the chicks getting sick from the big girls.

    Everyone told me I was crazy for not using medicated feed, but my chicks were fine. I've read that chicks raised in cooler weather will be much less likely to develop coccidiosis than those raised in warm weather. I do own Corid, which I'll use if I need to, but I hope it won't be necessary.

    If you're not raising your chickens organically and you're worried about coccidiosis, you might want to use medicated feed so you have one less thing to worry about. But even on medicated feed chicks can get coccidiosis, so I'd either get them outside as soon as you can or start adding dirt to their brooder to get them accustomed to the coccidia in your soil.
     
  5. Cockle-Dood

    Cockle-Dood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If these are the first chickens in an area...just moved and have my babies in the brooder right now...will exposing them to soil do anything, or is this more for addition of birds to an already existing flock?

    i do have dogs/cattle/horse that have probably roamed through the area that is now my coup set-up...would they transmit it or is this striclty an avian illness?
     
  6. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I regard medicated feed as I would the alternative of using Amprolium in water. The water is supposed to be changed daily with a new dose of Amprolium added. Now if one is using medicated feed, he/she would have to consider the storage and expiration of medicated feed. Feed should always be stored in a cool, dry place secured from pests. How long is the supplier storing it before you purchase it? Most feed stores sell it in 50 lb. quantities. If they sell in smaller bags, it is usually rationed out of the 50 lb. sacks. If one has a small quantity of chicks, how long will it take to go through 50 lbs. of feed? You certainly don't want those chicks eating expired or rancid feed. Those are just some thoughts to consider.
     
  7. RonC

    RonC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Amprolium is the active ingredient on Corid and also the only ingredient added to medicated feed. The difference is the dosage. Medicated feed had a very low dosage compaired with Corid.
     
  8. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    The dosage of Corid (Amprolium) can be adjusted for prevention as well as treatment. My point was the feed is more subject to losing its potency/spoiling compared to changing the water daily.
     
  9. Going Quackers

    Going Quackers Overrun With Chickens

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    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013

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