Normal or not?

Discussion in 'Pigeons and Doves' started by birdmantwo, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. birdmantwo

    birdmantwo Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Brushvalley Pa.
    I have a pair of white king pigeons who have just hatched 2 babys. Did not think they would hatch this time of year.
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Attentive good breeder pairs can raise young birds any time of year. I had a problem with some of my Birmingham roller pairs in that they would start preparing for a second round this time of year while the squabs were still sparsely feathered. Some cocks would actually brood the squabs at night while the hens were on eggs. Others would not and I lost some birds until I figured out what was going on. I solved the problem by combining squabs into large communal groups. The rollers were such great pumpers that all of the cocks would take care of the 'group clutch' and the squabs provided warmth for one another. I always used Feb. 14 th as my set up day for putting breeders back together. By the end of the month almost all of the birds would be on eggs.
     
  3. birdmantwo

    birdmantwo Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Brushvalley Pa.
    Its impressive that they can take the cold. This is there second set. Must be great parents.
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    I don't think that kings start the 'next' round as quickly as B rollers did. I know that my homers did not.
     
  5. birdmantwo

    birdmantwo Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Brushvalley Pa.
    Thanks for the info. I have been raising birds of all kinds 4 20 plus years. Just started into pigeons, also have silkies ( wifes hobby). Learn somthing new everyday. I am trying to learn how to use this computer. I"m used to reading books to find out things. This is alot faster,i could get use to this.
     
  6. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    I am borderline computer illiterate. Everything that I am able to do is self taught by trial and error. (Actually, that's sort of the way I have had to learn everything.) It's amazing the resources that can be made available on line. And the mistakes that can be made if you are not careful about what you type into search engines. [​IMG]
     
  7. birdmantwo

    birdmantwo Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Brushvalley Pa.
    LOL , yes i know . My 11 year old daughter is trying to teach me how to this thing. It is nice to get info so quick though.
     
  8. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    I had a pair of pigeons hatch eggs shortly after Christmas I live in Canada (Indian name for COLD). Here is a picture of them when they first hatched. I have another pair of pigeons due to hatch eggs Valentine's Day.
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    Here is a recent picture of them now

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    Here is what helped them survive when they got too big for the parents to incubate
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    This pigeon and his mate laid one egg today they are the parents of the squabs in the picture above.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
  9. larrylofts

    larrylofts Chillin' With My Peeps

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    IF YOUR KINGS ARE UTILITY KINGS WHICH IT SOUNDS LIKE THEY WERE BRED FOR PRODUCTION . THEY SHOULD HAVE BABIES ABOUT 2 WEEKS OLD AND BE BACK ON EGGS . THIS IS THE WAY THE SQUAB FARMS HAD IT GOING YEAR ROUND FOR PRODUCTION.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  10. laughingdog

    laughingdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    its normal for parents to lay in a second nest provided close to first, foot or so away, about after squeakers/squabs are two weeks old. male will take turns on new ones or stay on first nest, and he will take over primary care of first nest as female cares for the new nest. im pretty computer illiterate, and learned most from others much more experianced, or from my own experiances. homers and kings are supposedly the easiest to keep and breed.
     

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