Not going in

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by BadFitUp, May 16, 2016.

  1. BadFitUp

    BadFitUp Out Of The Brooder

    19
    1
    24
    Apr 8, 2016
    Have 9 1 1/2 month old chicks. They are now in the coup and last few really nice days I opened the door to run and let them stretch there legs. Use the new feeder and water system. But at night they wouldn't go into the coup on there own. Have to put them in there. Why do they not go up? Is it because I let them out before 2 months. The heat lamp is on in coup. It is warm and not chilly like the nights are. New to this so please enlighten

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
     
  2. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

    18,821
    1,193
    396
    Mar 26, 2011
    Upper Peninsula Michigan
    Keep them inside the coop for a week until they learn where they sleep. For now, leave their food and water inside once you do let them out to encourage them to go inside.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,687
    4,372
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    It's normal for chicks to not go in by themselves. When hen raised the mom hen gathers them and takes them to bed. You will probably have to round them up for a while, as you are the mom, when they reach sexual maturity and feel more responsible they start going in by themselves.
     
  4. BadFitUp

    BadFitUp Out Of The Brooder

    19
    1
    24
    Apr 8, 2016
    At what age Do I have to have the chicken and the egg "Speech" them? Lol sorry bad joke.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
     
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,687
    4,372
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    at around 4-5 months give them the talk. Every batch I've raised do the same thing, they become naughty teenagers who want to stay out late, than they are too scared to go into the coop when it gets too dark. Like most kids they make bad decisions.
     
  6. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    728
    153
    156
    Jul 18, 2013
    Kalispell MT
    How warm is your coop? How warm does it get when the chickens were locked inside it? Chickens really don't like warmth. They do much better in cool temperatures. Chickens come with their own down comforter. Mine do just fine in Montana when it's -10 F below 0. I don't give them any additional heat. At the age of your birds they are fully feathered and do not require any added heat.
     
  7. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

    9,923
    2,898
    421
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    Why don't chicks want to go into the coop at night? It's simple. Because it looks strange and unfamiliar to them from outside in the run, and chicks are very hesitant to go anywhere that's unfamiliar.

    Snatching them up and stuffing them into the coop at night isn't really accomplishing anything other than to stress everyone needlessly. Have you noticed when they are getting ready to huddle together to sleep at night they do a very soft trilling? That's when you get into the coop with a small flashlight to light their way, and using their favorite treat, lure them inside.

    It just takes a couple nights of this and they'll be going inside all by themselves like big kids.

    By the way, while cooping adult chickens up for several days is a good idea so they get accustomed to their new coop, it really doesn't work with chicks because of what I pointed out in my first paragraph. No matter how many days they spend cooped up, the coop will still look strange to them when they view it from outside in the run.
     
  8. BadFitUp

    BadFitUp Out Of The Brooder

    19
    1
    24
    Apr 8, 2016
    Males sence. It was 47 last night so I didn't want to make them to cold. My coop I has a heat lamp 4ft up. Just to help with chill. Figured it would make it more appeasing. I mean I coud leave coop door open 24/7 it's very secure in the run. Let them do what they want.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
     
  9. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    728
    153
    156
    Jul 18, 2013
    Kalispell MT
    Chickens are NOT cold when it's 47 degrees outside. In fact, they are very comfortable at that temperature. The problem is that you are thinking about how you would feel at that temperature. You don't have feathers. You are not covered in down. At -10 degrees my chickens are outside all day by choice. Their food and water is outside. They don't even want to go into the unheated coop until it's night. They must be happy. They laid tons of eggs all winter long.

    Just give this a try. Turn off that heat lamp. See if your chickens are more willing to go inside with that heat lamp turned off. Chickens LIKE cool weather. They suffer most in the summer when it gets warm. They would rather the temperature be at 47 degrees than at 80.

    I have a feeling you are torturing your birds with what you believe is kindness.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2016
  10. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    728
    153
    156
    Jul 18, 2013
    Kalispell MT
    Let me explain how chickens stay warm. First, a dry chicken is a warm chicken. Chickens trap air pockets under their down. These air pockets provide insulation for the chicken. It's like you going out in the winter and dressing in layers. You are warmer with several light layers than you are with one heavy layer.

    Now back to the coop. You need passive air circulation. You don't want the chickens in a draft, but you want to get that warm but moist air out of the coop. Since warm air rises the moisture will go out the upper vents. I know it sounds wacky, but again, a dry chicken is a warm chicken. Get that moisture out. A closed up coop that has high humidity will be more likely to have frost bitten chickens than a coop with lots of high ventilation and low humidity even though the coop with high humidity might be warmer. A closed up coop might also have high ammonia levels due to the poop staying moist and not drying out. This makes the air in the coop unhealthy for the chickens to breathe.

    There are a lot of members here who live in areas where winters are harsh. They live in Alaska, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Michigan, Wyoming, New York, etc. They don't heat their coops. The fire danger from the heat lamps is just way too high and unnecessary for most climates. Remember, the pioneers had chickens. They didn't have electricity and their chickens were fine. The wild birds outside find places that are out of the wind to sleep at night.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by