Not much info on 'Split wings' but just how bad is it?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ColeyPoultry, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. ColeyPoultry

    ColeyPoultry Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 28, 2010
    Foxton, New Zealand
    I understand that any bird with split wings are immediately 'disqualified' from showing but I can't find any more information about split wings other than to say that such bird faces disqualification from shows.

    So what chance does a bird have, if found without an axial feather? Is it something permanently defective associated with its genetics or does it just render a bird useless for showing that year but may come the year after?

    Can someone please shed some light into this because at the moment, I've got it in my head that if a bird is found with split-wings, its no good for anything except as a 'cull bird.' [​IMG]
     
  2. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Split wing is a genetic condition, not simply the temporary absence of an axial feather. A bird with a split wing should not be used for breeding in a show line as the condition will be passed to a large percentage of the offspring.
    Split wing is only a problem from an exhibition perspective. It does not harm the bird as a layer or meat bird.l
     
  3. ColeyPoultry

    ColeyPoultry Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 28, 2010
    Foxton, New Zealand
    Thank you for answering [​IMG] I've been away particupating in a poultry show (I'm a first timer) so have done very well having come away with a Black Wyandotte Bantam champion (Very rare breed here in NZ).

    This bird with Split wings, is a barred Plymouth Rock bantam (Not common in NZ and is very rare in the Nth Island). I've had his 'egg-mate' entered into shows where he came away having won a championship.

    While I was still hunting for some answers to 'split-wings' and finding out what it means in genetical term, I had this 'split winged' bird checked out by an experienced breeder/exhibitioner who acknowledges that while such bird is very rare where we are, he got a very small axial feather so he may still be moulting or have 'weak wings' (wing muscles I think he said?).

    In his opinion, it was best to hold him back as a reserve while I carry out my 'special breeding' with the champion bird (same breed). So if something happens to the best bird then I, (unfortunately) would end up with this defective one to work with. So I'm doing my best to ensure that nothing untowards happen to the champion bird.
     

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