Not sure about safe insulation

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jennysbrood, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. jennysbrood

    jennysbrood New Egg

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    Mar 22, 2017
    I was wondering if anyone knew if it is safe, in a nontoxic way, to use roofing paper or something similar to line the inside walls and roof of a raised hen house with for insulation? I live in the mountains with a lot of wind and snow. Thank you for your help. I thought I could also spray the roofing paper or something like it with a nontoxic water proofing spray I saw. What do you think?
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    You most likely do not need to do that. Consider that you do need ventilation. Sealing off the coop to be soo airtight may not be very good. You only want to prevent direct drafts, which you cab achieve with stapling wood slats over the wider openings. Read up some articles about ventilation and you will learn A LOT.. I can find you some if you have difficulty finding. If you are determined to keep rainwater out, then place roofing materials on the outside.
    WISHING YOU BEST.. [​IMG]
     
  3. jennysbrood

    jennysbrood New Egg

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    Mar 22, 2017
    Thank you for your reply. I know that ventilation is important but do you think more will be needed than the two screened ventilation windows that my hen house was built with? I would not cover up those windows. I was just trying to think of something that would be easy to protect the house better and keep my hens a little warmer because of the weather here in the mountains. Thank you
     
  4. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Pictures of the coop? Ventilation needs to take into consideration roost placement. No amount of insulation will make up for poor positioning of vents in relation to roosts.
     
  5. jennysbrood

    jennysbrood New Egg

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    Mar 22, 2017
    Do you mean if the roost's are at the level of the vents because then I could see how they would still be cold, or do you mean something else? The hen house I bought was one from Tractor Supply called the Big Green Walk in chicken coop the one that says for up to 15 or so birds, I don't have that many now though. I just got it and as soon as the snow is gone I will put it together. I am going to put a non toxic wood water protector on it before I put it together and so I thought at that time I would also line the inside walls and roof also with something that would help protect the house because it was expensive and also by hens so they would be well. Maybe you think I don't need to do this at all, I just thought it would be a good idea and I wanted to here what experienced poultry raisers thought. I have heard for weather like I have here in the mountains, insulation is a good idea. Maybe even something as simple as a thick type of felt cloth that had water protector on it to line the inside with ? Thank you to you and everyone else for your time and wisdom. I do appreciate it.
     
  6. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG]
    Is this the coop you purchased. I got pix from Tractor Supply website. Looks like roosts would be in almost direct draft of the vents above nest boxes. At least the heads of chickens would be affected. If you only had small bantam chickens, than the roost only a few inches off the floor would be OK. These vents would be fine for hot weather time. NO GOOD FOR WINTER. Here are my thoughts......... Install good size vents into the gable portion on both sides of coop portion. That would mean that you would be modifying it. I'm sure many others here will agree with my thinking... The other 2 vents that are there would be used during summer . During winter I would cover them with clear glass, or plexiglass so that light gets into coop. (also important)
    Many peeps do not think highly of these ready made coops. They are over rated for the amount of chickens that they are supposed to house. (ALL OF THE MANUFACTURERS DO SAME OVER RATE). I personally think that they are fine for someone starting out.[​IMG] I suggest that they start with small numbers of chickens and learn just what it takes to keep chickens happy. Overcrowding is a very real problem maker. In time you may find out that you will need to predator proof your setup somewhat. Just take things one step at a time and above ALL, ENJOY YOUR CHICKENS. [​IMG]
     
  7. jennysbrood

    jennysbrood New Egg

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    Mar 22, 2017
    Thank you so much, you were very helpful and nice too. The higher vents do sound like a good idea and I will do that. I will also be thinking more about insulation ideas because of the snow and high winds here in the mountains.. I do plan on enjoying my chickens, I already am. I recently bought 6 Orpington pullets, which are in my shed right now staying warm. I have read several articles saying that they are a cold hardy bird so that will help. I do want them to be happy and healthy. I have always had livestock and of course dogs in my life but not chickens, I think they will be good. Thank you for your time.
     

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