Not sure where to post this??

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by rjrinehart, Mar 26, 2017.

  1. rjrinehart

    rjrinehart Out Of The Brooder

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    So, hello everyone! My husband and I have quail and I'm thinking about getting chickens NEXT spring. We will either buy or build our own coop and run. I've just got some questions about chickens in general. I've done all my research for my quail but what about chickens? Anything and everything about anything having to do with chickens is great!! I hope putting this post on the raising baby chicks is appropriate since I am now to chickens! Thanks!
     
  2. jenvander

    jenvander Just Hatched

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    How many chicks were you thinking of getting? Do you have any varieties that you were inclined towards?

    There are several great articles here on BYC. I've followed them and my chicks are doing great despite this being my first time (though my husband grew up in a farm and they had poultry). Here is a great chick article:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/...ks-the-first-60-days-of-raising-baby-chickens

    Lots of great stuff on Pinterest for building your own coop, so many frugal enthusiasts out there [​IMG]. I got one for $190 at Tractor Supply that was prefab and went together in under two hours, and looks quite nice too. I am putting it inside a larger run so they have fenced in free range. Lots of predators here so I'll be locking them into the coop at night. Box-in-box protection [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  3. rjrinehart

    rjrinehart Out Of The Brooder

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    That's a really good idea. I've seen a lot of coops on there that people have made were it's box in box. And it seems really great seeing as we have coyotes and coons and probably hawks in the area.

    Probably just hens for now. My hubs and I just found out that we are in an a-1 district of our town and so we are going to get a few. They can't be free range. So probably just 3-4.
     
  4. rjrinehart

    rjrinehart Out Of The Brooder

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    And I'm not really sure. I've been looking around on here of the different breeds and I'm thinking about orphingtons?
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    There are so many choices! Try ordering a variety, and see who you like best, and who does well where you live. Mary
     
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    CENTRAL MAINE
    I'm a fan of a mixed flock. If you order all one breed, you may have a bit of a hard time telling them all apart. Also, while a breed looks like the perfect bird when you read about it, you may actually come to the conclusion that that breed is simply not the best choice for you. Or a bird that you weren't very impressed with (on paper) ends up being a favorite. Case in point: several years ago, I ordered some Pioneer meat birds. Of course they were all intended to go into the freezer. I also hatched out some eggs, and ordered several other breeds of laying hens. The pioneers were delicious. But, on a whim, I held one of those pullets back on processing day. She became the first pullet to lay that season, and remained my most productive hen for a while. She contributed to the gene pool of future generations.

    What is your climate. That should enter into your breed selection. Generally, birds with large combs excel in warmer climates, while birds with smaller combs are not as prone to frost bite. I'm not at all a fan of feather footed birds b/c they can track a lot of mud and other junk into the nest on those feathers. Birds with crests or other unusual plumage may not do as well in a mixed flock, b/c flock mates may pick on them, and those extra feathers make it difficult for those birds to see an approaching predator.

    Check out Henderson's chicken breeds chart. What ever you choose, I recommend that you get them all from the same place at the same time. Don't rule out back yard mixes, and check out the breeders in your own state. Though I am partial for ordering from a hatchery instead of getting local birds.

    Other considerations: Be sure your coop is big enough for current needs, as well as eventual needs: brooding replacement chicks, providing housing for a broody, or a bird that needs to be segregated. Bare minimum is 4 s.f. in coop and 10 s.f. in run/bird IMO.

    Look at deep litter management. Best accomplished with soil floored coop, but can also be done with standard construction. Hoop coops make excellent low cost housing.

    Consider fermented feed, and heating pad brooding. Enjoy!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2017
  7. MadieWestbrook

    MadieWestbrook Out Of The Brooder

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    I agree with a mixed flock! We have Americanas (a personal favorite, very good layers!), Orpingtons, Naked Necks, Barred Rocks (another favorite just for the beautiful feathers), and Rhode Island Reds (ANOTHER BIG FAVE).

    You'll figure out what you like best when you go to purchase them or see them for the first time. :)
     
  8. jenvander

    jenvander Just Hatched

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    Post pictures of your new babies when you get them [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     

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