Nothing but chirping?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by GalloNegrito, May 7, 2016.

  1. GalloNegrito

    GalloNegrito Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a few chicks that recently hatched, they won't stop chirping, I don't necessarily mind it. I'm just curious if it means that something's wrong. I fed them, have them water, and tried to get them to go to sleep. Nothing really worked for too long, any ideas on how why they might be chirping or how I could probably get them to calm down?
     
  2. TheKindaFarmGal

    TheKindaFarmGal Overrun With Chickens

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    Somewhere in the Universe
    Chicks peep a lot. Are yours warm enough?
     
  3. Choco Maran

    Choco Maran Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Generally this means they re happy little campers. They will be quite if some thing is wrong or make a very loud chirp if they are scared or worried.
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    There's a big difference between normal social cheeping, and scared/ cold louder more insistent cheeps. Make sure the heat source is right, and food and water available. Are they fine now? Mary
     
  5. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Chicks in isolation from other chicks cheep constantly as they are attempting to locate the rest of the chicks they understand from a deep instinct that should be around somewhere, if only they keep chirping, they will get an answer from these theoretical chicks.

    This is why newly hatched chicks alone in an incubator will set to peeping loudly even though they're warm and healthy. This is one reason why isolated chicks will fixate on a human. They need company. Any company.

    However, non-stop chirping, even when a chick has the company of a brooder full of chicks, is a warning sign that the chick is in distress. It may be constipated, in pain, hungry because it's not assimilating nutrients, or just plain failure to thrive.

    The best way for a new comer to chicks to judge the difference between a sick chick and normal healthy ones is to compare. When you see a chick standing alone in the brooder, not too steady on its feet, and eyes at half mast, and all the other chicks are running around acting like busy bodies, the sick one will really stand out.
     
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