Now Im doubting what Ive read

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by halo, Dec 31, 2008.

  1. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    Nov 22, 2007
    Florida
    My Coop
    I have an incubator and a hatcher going. The incubator has been going nonstop, it seems, since February. So Im on day 20 for a batch of eggs, and I have them in the hatcher. I upped the humidity to 60%, the humidity in the incubator is about 40%. So I heard a peeper, ran to the hatcher...no peeper. Wha??? Figured I must have been hearing things, went back...heard it again, a peeper! Went to the hatcher, looked again (just in case I missed it the first time)...no peeper. I looked in the incubator...there it was!! I dont know what happened, I have staggered hatches going on in there, and I must have left an egg in there when moving them, but she hatched as cleanly and as perfectly as a chick can hatch.

    So the point of this whole thing is, perhaps humidity being so high isnt as important as was thought previously. Ive had far more problems with hatches when the humidity was too high then with it being too low.
     
  2. Laskaland

    Laskaland ThE gRoOvY cHiCkEn

    Aug 2, 2008
    Nebraska
    Quote:I would agree.. I did a staggered hatch this month too- first two hatches I monitored very closely, had great hatches. This last one, I let the temp get to 110 (still air, no kidding!) plus, the humidity was down to 15 and even on day 19 I had managed to get it up in the high 30s...well, they all hatched anyway. [​IMG]

    I think it's all about good quality eggs. Good fertility and fresh, high quality. Apparently that is what it takes?? I mean if I had the eggs at 110 for the whole 21 days , I doubt they would have hatched. But gosh the humidity sucked and they still popped out? [​IMG]

    christina
     
  3. ginbart

    ginbart Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 9, 2008
    Bloomsburg, PA
    I have been reading a lot and I'm on day 4, I've decided to keep my humidity down because I have never got above 50% on my hatchs. I am keeping it between 25 and 40 for the first 18 days then only up to around 50 the last 3 days.

    These are mostly my own eggs. I do have some that were shipped so I'm excited to see what happens. So many people say you can drown them with to much humidity.

    Good luck with yours.
     
  4. ThePamperedPullet

    ThePamperedPullet Chillin' With My Peeps

    hello halo
    hey, we started running all ours through dry incubation and then when they go into the brooder/hatcher we just have a tin can with water in it in there. We quit paying attention to the humidity levels and now that we are more relaxed we are getting 90% or better hatch rates. Always running staggered hatches so it is tough to try to keep it all even any way. Out of the last 100 or so chicks, we have probably had two that got stuck in the shell and we had to help out.
     
  5. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    Nov 22, 2007
    Florida
    My Coop
    Im really thinking that higher humidity is the cause of more problems than not enough, especially if you keep the lid on once the hatch has started. Even tho the humidity is very low here right now, Im going to really back off of the humidity from here on it.

    Ive always wondered why the humidity has to be upped during hatching and why it has to be at 40-50 for the first 18 days. I dont know of any broody hens who have read the same hatching books that we all have. Ive also noticed once the first chick has hatched, the moisture from that chick hatching raised the humidity, so Im wondering if that isnt enough right there?
     
  6. jvls1942

    jvls1942 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2008
    wausau,wisconsin
    Quote:I would agree.. I did a staggered hatch this month too- first two hatches I monitored very closely, had great hatches. This last one, I let the temp get to 110 (still air, no kidding!) plus, the humidity was down to 15 and even on day 19 I had managed to get it up in the high 30s...well, they all hatched anyway. [​IMG]

    I think it's all about good quality eggs. Good fertility and fresh, high quality. Apparently that is what it takes?? I mean if I had the eggs at 110 for the whole 21 days , I doubt they would have hatched. But gosh the humidity sucked and they still popped out? [​IMG]

    christina

    It is possible that your thermometer is not reading right.

    but you cannot argue with success,

    when using that thermometer use that reading, but I would be cautious about using the same reading on a different thermometer..
     
  7. geareduplyn

    geareduplyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 2, 2008
    Salley SC
    As the chicks hatch the humidity will go up no matter if you are hatching under a hen or in an incubator. This is probably the reason so called "dry hatching " is sucessful. If you will observe carefully the hen will sit very tightly during the hatch preserving the moisture under her.
     
  8. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    Aug 24, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Using a hatcher, main thing it keeps the incubator clean. Raising the humidity does help the hatch rate, but you will still hatch a few without doing it.

    Try to get a 100% you need to get everything right.

    You can set eggs,turn once a day, humidity at 30%, temp from 95 to 103. you will still hatch a few,.not many.

    Depends on what kind of hatch rate you want. With chickens I have hatch 1000s in the bottom tray of a incubator. With my Peafowl,and turkey eggs those are all move to my hatcher with higher humidity.
     
  9. Laskaland

    Laskaland ThE gRoOvY cHiCkEn

    Aug 2, 2008
    Nebraska
    Quote:Hi there!
    I always use two digitals at different parts of the bator and kind of average the two. In that case, both were the same...

    Thanks!
    Christina
     
  10. Buster

    Buster Back to Work

    A lot of it has to do with your elevation and climate. There is an excellent post by Seminolewind on a humidity thread here that explains how eggs laid at lower elevations are different than eggs laid at higher elevations.

    I tried the dry incubation method and I tried several lower humidity methods. I finally, as a last ditch effort, followed the advice of several people in my own area and upped the humidity to the 70-80% range and have gotten far better hatches than ever before. The best previous hatch was 25% and now my best is 83%, with what looks like another promising hatch in the works.

    Now with this I am in no way trying to suggest that other people should try the same thing. I am saying that you should find out what works best for your locale and go with it.

    Edited for spelling
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2009

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