Now what?! Black spot on roo's wattles.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TheOLDNewChick, Dec 28, 2007.

  1. TheOLDNewChick

    TheOLDNewChick I'm an original

    Jun 12, 2007
    Tioga, Louisiana
    I went out to the coop just now and I noticed my WCB polish roo's wattles have turned almost black, and it smells. It's hard, as well. I noticed part of one of them got torn off. Other than that, he seems healthy. Frostbite? It hasn't been that cold.. I don't know what it is.



    This is just not my week.
     
  2. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Avian Pox?
     
  3. TheOLDNewChick

    TheOLDNewChick I'm an original

    Jun 12, 2007
    Tioga, Louisiana
    I was afraid of that. Should he be kept away from the other birds?
     
  4. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    I would separate him, as a precaution. I believe it's very contagious but not life threatening and it is curable. If you post a picture it would help better diagnose what your bird may have. I don't see how it could be frostbite if you've not had any freezing or near freezing temperatures.
     
  5. pollysmum

    pollysmum Out Of The Brooder

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    Is there any chance you can post a picture

    Pox tends to come in spots to start with not one large darkened area

    When you say the bird has been pecked... could it be that the comb has bled and its dry blood your seeing...

    Have you given it a very gentle wash

    Do you have any antibiotic cream you could apply after cleaning it

    A picture would be great
     
  6. Pinenot

    Pinenot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pox will be on the face as well as comb and waddles. Frostbite can happen in humid, cold air, even if it is not much below freezing. The thing that has me wondering is that you say it smells???
     
  7. pollysmum

    pollysmum Out Of The Brooder

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    That has me worried too

    That is why I would like to see a picture.

    If the wattles dip into water... and the temperature drops, the water on the wattles may make them freeze

    Do not rub them
    Do not try and heat them

    You can gently put Vaseline on them to help heal and protect them.
    You can also use Vic's vapour rub, itÂ’s got a little med in it that would help heal any wounds and keep infection out.

    Moisture in the air makes chickens cold by absorbing body heat.
    Combs and wattles are therefore more likely to freeze in damp housing than in dry housing.
    Since cocks don't sleep with their heads tucked under a wing, as hens do, cocks are more likely than hens to have their combs and wattles frozen when temperatures dip during the night.

    Cocks with large combs are more likely than other to be frostbitten.
    Frozen combs and wattles look pale.
    If you discover the condition while the part is still frozen, apply a damp, warm cloth (105 F, 40.5 C) to the frozen part for 15 minutes or until it thaws
    DO NOT RUB.


    After the part has thawed gently apply an antiseptic ointment such as Neosporin.
    Isolate the bird and keep an eye on it to see that the comb heals properly
    Frozen wattles and combs are more likely to be discovered after they have thawed and become red, hot, swollen, and painful.

    The bird doesn't feel like moving and is listless, and loses interest in eating
    If the part has already thawed, warming it is no longer necessary.
    Gently coat the part with Neosporin and isolate the bird
    After the swelling goes down, the skin may peel, the part may itch, and it may be sensitive to cold for a while.

    It may turn scabby, develop pus, and eventually fall off. The suffering cock will continue to lose weight and may become infertile
    If the comb or wattles were seriously frozen, instead of swelling they may remain cold, begin to shrivel, and eventually die back

    Other chickens may peck at the affected part making things worse
    If the comb or wattle turns black, the affected tissue has died and gangrene has set in - the comb or wattle is no longer receiving a blood supply and must be surgically removed
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2007
  8. TheOLDNewChick

    TheOLDNewChick I'm an original

    Jun 12, 2007
    Tioga, Louisiana
    I've got pictures. Sorry, most of them are really kind of blurry.


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  9. Pine Grove

    Pine Grove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'ts not pox, looks like a pecking wound
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2007
  10. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

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    Quote:Right, my roo's will get this from time to time.

    Clean it with saline and put an antibiotic on it and it will heal.
     

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