NPIP program comments? (National Poultry Improvement Program)

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by exop, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. exop

    exop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all, I wondered who out there has experience with the NPIP?

    I've wondered what it takes to participate in the National Poultry Improvement Program. Is it costly, is it difficult to join or to qualify, is a lot of annual testing called for, how regular or how intrusive are the inspections, and do you lose control over your own flock in any way?

    Who administers the inspections - what is the probability of a flock actuallty contracting something from the inspector? (I don't have a lot of confidence that local officials here would observe very stringent biosecurity standards).

    It sounds like a good program, but I raise endangered breeds and am afraid that if some epidemic struck in my home state, the NPIP would require me to destroy birds rather than to try to nurse them through it with any and all available medications.

    Any thoughts?

    Best - exop
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    the NPIP would require me to destroy birds rather than to try to nurse them through it with any and all available medications.

    If pullorum or typhoid entered my flock, they'd need to be put down. That is mainly what NPIP tests for--it was created for the safety of the food supply, not to put a stamp of overall health on backyard flocks, which it cannot do. Plus, using medications for most respiratory illness only makes them permanent carriers of those diseases. I don't want any birds, eggs or chicks from someone whose flock has been ill and treated. You can be NPIP and still have a bunch of Typhoid Marys in your flock.

    Testing for pullorum/Typhoid is yearly, but as I understand it, if you want testing for Mycoplasmosis/CRD, they must be tested every few months for extra $$$. The cost varies by state so I can't speak to that--some states are expensive and some are almost free.


    ETA: I am not NPIP nor do I have plans to be, though some NPIP participants have gotten birds from me and they all tested negative for everything, including mycoplasmosis.​
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  3. exop

    exop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:There's a middle ground between "the food supply" and "backyard flocks" , which is where I find myself. As a serious poultry breeder and preservationist, I feel I have a responsibility both to improve and promote my breed. Promote includes, disseminating breeding stock to other people. Having looked into the import regulations of a few other states and Canada, I've noticed that while the NPIP may have been developed to enroll and protect large commercial poultry concerns, it has been adopted as a de facto standard for poultry transit between states, and even into Canada.

    Just check out some of the state regulations linked on the USDA's site...

    Best - exop
     
  4. exop

    exop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Dec 23, 2010
  5. hiddenmagnolia

    hiddenmagnolia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When we showed our birds we where in the NPIP program. In the state of Louisiana testing was free. We called made appointment. Tester came to our house. The first time we had to test every bird on property. So if you have a lot of birds let them know how large you flock is. I did my testing in the fall did not want to stress my birds out in the summer by trying to catch them in 100 degree weather. It has to be above a certain temp. for the test to work. I think it had to be above 60 degrees. Temps. dropped one year we had to keep her truck running to keep test box warm enough to do test. After first test they did a random test on a certain precentage of flock once a year. Since they where show birds I caught and held each bird myself so that they where not stressed out anymore than necessary. We raised Cornish standard and bantams. So they could not stay on their back for long to get the blood sample. She would tell me when she was ready for next bird. Then I would catch bird turn it over, she would draw blood from under wing. We no longer show so we stopped testing.
     
  6. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    Quote:Mine sure did-he suited up in something that strongly resembled a hazmat suit and sprayed himself down VERY well before he entered and after he left my coop/run area.
    I think testing a flock for ANY disease is a great thing, but AI, Newcastles, Mareks, MG...they don't test for those. Wish they would and I've asked them to.
    My inspection here in Texas was actually free and I am required to test once a year and no, you absolutely don't lose control over your flock.
    I also raise some rare breeds, and have no concern that if a disease struck down here that the State would come destroy my birds.
    I cannot travel in the State of Texas nor show/sell without that NPIP certification.
    I really see no harm it in whatsoever.
     
  7. exop

    exop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, everyone. It sounds like no-one has had a bad experience with the program.

    Quote:That's very, very cool! [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Best - exop
     

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