NPIP Testing Question--Please Help!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ChickenChik, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. ChickenChik

    ChickenChik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2010
    Kinsey, Alabama
    The other night DH and I went to a sale and sold some of our chickens. When we got there we were told that our chickens were suppose to be NPIP and we were asked if a few of our birds could be tested for the state. Well we had no clue about NPIP and we allowed the man to test our birds. They all appeared in good health, but now I am worried. First, what is some of the tests come back and something is wrong with these birds? These are birds that we got from other people, will that matter? What will they do to the rest of my flock? Second, is it worth it to get NPIP? We are not regular sellers but do plan on selling eggs and chicks some time. Any feedback would be great!
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2010
  2. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    It is worth it to get NPIP certified. Would you want to be selling of birds that carry the disease, without knowing it?
     
  3. teddiliza

    teddiliza Chillin' With My Peeps

    They were probably just testing them for pullorum-typhoid and avian influenza. My state representative told me It's actually pretty rare to have either of these. If you had any positives on the pullorum test they would have confiscated your birds immediately most likely (At least that's how they do it in Missouri). You're probably fine. I have heard of some false positives that got someone's bird confiscated, but when they did a necropsy, the bird turned out to be negative. Most states have regulations that require you to be NPIP to ship to their state.
     
  4. ChickenChik

    ChickenChik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2010
    Kinsey, Alabama
    If my birds had these diseases would they show any symptoms? As I said mine appeared healthy! Thank y'all so much for your responses!
     
  5. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Symptoms of pullorum can vary from the mild to the fatal, with extremely acute cases causing sudden death. After a few days incubation the young birds may become weak and somnolent. They may become anorexic and grow poorly with chalky white excreta in their vent. Death may then follow. In the small number of older birds that catch the disease symptoms may include lethargy and wing droop, for example.​
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    NPIP was set up to protect the food supply, not protect backyard flock owners or even certify that the birds are completely healthy. Everyone seems to think it's more than it really is.
     

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