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Number of eggs laid vs age of chicken?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Renthorin, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. Renthorin

    Renthorin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
    Dexter Michigan
    So I've been reading that chickens lay more eggs when young and progressively fewer each year. I also know they have a finite number of ovum.

    What causes the decrease in egg production?
    If I encourage them to lay during the winter months via a lightbulb (not planning to do this) will I get more eggs over their lifespan?

    If I let egg production drop during the winter will I get more eggs later in their lives?

    Just trying to see if there is a pattern to this :)


    Will
     
  2. ajay

    ajay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 1, 2011
    From what I understand, chickens lay x number of eggs. If you have them lay during the winter, it will decrease the number of years they lay, but the amount of eggs will equal out to someone who does not use extra light. Make sense?
     
  3. Renthorin

    Renthorin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
    Dexter Michigan
    I think so. That is what I was hoping would happen.

    I hear of hens that are cycled out at 3 years because of lower production and I thought if I let them rest during the winter and not force them to lay, hopefully they will lay longer into their lifespan.
     
  4. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NJ
    Keep in mind that not all chickens are the same. Diet, weather, environment all can be factors. The pros rotate their flocks after 1-year of production because the laying rate will start to slow. Some will take vacations for months to molt. Quality of the eggs will become less predictable. Thin cells and soft cells are more frequent even there is calcium supplement.
     
  5. Renthorin

    Renthorin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
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    But in general it's safe to assume that if I let the hens rest in the winter they won't burn through their ovum as quickly and will lay later in life, though at a decreased amount?
     
  6. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NJ
    Quote:Sounds plausible, not sure if true. I used a dawn light over the winter and would say that the result was inconclusive. Although, the pros do it. I read the idea is that the extended time will allow the birds to feed more to replenish their energy, which is important in the cold winter. Some of mine laid and some stopped. They did not seem to lay or stop just because a light was turned on or off in the coop.
     

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