Odd behavior

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by dogkahuna, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. dogkahuna

    dogkahuna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 11, 2015
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    We have two flocks that share the same pen. The original flock is one rooster and 9 hens. In August, one of the hens hatched 7 chicks which turned out to be 3 roos and 4 pullets. The mother hen did the maternal thing for two months, then returned to the original flock. Each flock has its own coop which are both decent-sized.

    The last couple nights, one of the young roos has been roosting with the older flock instead of his clutch-mates. Any ideas about why? Thanks!
     
  2. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Sometimes cockerels or pullets will begin roosting and hanging out with older birds simply on account of their maturing process. That cockerel of yours might just be at the stage where he is ready to leave his mama and siblings. The other reason he may be roosting with the older birds is because he is being bullied by one or more of his hatch-mates. Have you noticed any bullying behaviors lately?
     
  3. dogkahuna

    dogkahuna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 11, 2015
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    Hi MP! I think you're right. While I've been at work during daylight hours, I haven't witnessed much. However, the telltale signs are there. My turncoat roo is cowering below the older flock on the floor or lower roosts. There is a dominant roo (who crows) among the younger flock who I've seen messing with older hens. I haven't seen interactions between the established cock and lesser males yet.
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Your young cockerels are about the right age to become sexually mature.

    With one mature cockbird and 3 young cockerels,
    you might seriously want to consider getting rid of some of those males,
    or at least get some separate enclosures/cages ready.

    Could come home to a testosterone laced blood bath.
     
  5. dogkahuna

    dogkahuna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 11, 2015
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    Thanks--I'm ready for that eventuality...been expecting it! I'd planned on giving the 3 young roos their own coop and pen (actually tractoring them around to keep them useful) but if removing them from the females doesn't stop the aggression, I'll have to consider other options.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    That's great!
    I'd do it now, before they start bickering or 'chasing' pullets.

    I've found having a few small foldable wire dogs crates to be indispensable in my chickeneering endeavor.
    Nice to be able to whip out a crate to stop and problem....or isolate an injured or ill bird.
    Been thru the cockerel madness....it comes on fast ...and being able to isolate them turns it off fast too, much relief for everyone.
    Now I eat them before they get to that age.
     

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