Odd Cockerel behavior

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chicksooner, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So I have a young guy that comes up to me both in the coop and when free ranging and grabs my pants leg. Then I reach down to pet him and he gets my hand. I don't think he is being aggressive as I have experienced an aggressive rooster. I am wondering if it is his way of begging for treats or attention or just has a loose screw. [​IMG] He is a 5 month old black orpington.
     
  2. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    He's young. Give him another month or two and I'd be willing to bet this behavior will escalate. They are often at their worst between about 6 months and a year old.
     
  3. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so you mean he will get worse?
     
  4. fancyfowl4ever

    fancyfowl4ever Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He is challenging you, he wants to be head honcho and it will probably get worse.
     
  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Well he might. It's very normal when their hormones kick in for the them to want to challenge you. If you start discouraging that behavior now he's young, he may get the hint. Or he may not. Some roosters are very decent birds and other's are terrorists and they stay that way!

    When he approaches you I would push him away, make him back off. Always make him move out of your space and don't let up until he turns away and goes about his business. I'm not saying to kick or hit him, just keep him moving away, whether it's with your foot or a barn rake, whatever. If he's going to get nasty the next thing he's going to try is jumping up and spurring your leg. It hurts! Don't let him go there!

    You'll just have to work with him and see how he does. My current rooster was a real pain in the backside until around a year old, then he settled down and is decent to be around. Some of them never do learn to behave and I don't keep those roo's.
     
  6. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    will work on him. If he gets worse or directs it to anyone other than me he is going to feel the sharp edge of an axe. Silly boy. He has been my favorite and has been spoiled rotten.
     
  7. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Well, I think he could be challenging you a bit...but I think it's equally likely that he's demanding attention or food...which I suppose some would view as asserting/challenging too. It sounds like it's no big deal right now, and that you know how to handle things if his demands for whatever become problematic.
    I have hens who'll do what you've described and I've always viewed it like a toddler or dog "demanding" attention...which is not big deal to me. Personally, I enjoy the more personable birds like that.
     
  8. nok13

    nok13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    frankly i cant understand why people allow (mostly male) animals to 'demand' attention... animals that 'demand' attention are basically 'in your face' .. would u allow horse to do the same thing the rooster is doing? dont think so. its like the behavior of little dogs (i have two that were terrorists, the original owner of the male couldnt go in to their own house w/o getting attacked).. because its cute or the animal is little or the behavior is misunderstood, in the end, someone gets bitten and the animal becomes soup/rehomed/put down...

    a very pushy animal, esepecially a male (with spurs, horns, strong front legs, whatever) demaning food is not showing 'love' , it is showing dominance and 'demanding; that u give in... the poster that mentioned to push back or 'stomp' on im, (the same way another male would) is correct.

    i was almost killed by a 'overfriendly' male sheep with horns because the original owner thought that when it was a lamb, that pushy behavior was cute. a 90 kilo hormone driven male sheep is no laughng matter. neither is a male ostrich that pecks and steals your food from the pail before its is in its 'house', or a jack donkey that grabs the bucker or towers over u with his head arched and nips at you (mating actions); and a rooster's spurs can traumatize a small child whose face is just at the right level (we had a lawsuit because of a peacock attacking a child that way.)
    frankly i could be hoisted by my own petard becaue my lhasa male, although waaaaaay better then five years ago, is still a biter of white males (he's racist, only tolerates thai men or his arabic prevous owner. he hates anyone that is tall or with a caucasion face. with women he is less problematic and with young girls (no boys, only girls) he has no problems because of his socialization with my duaghters.-- in any other family he would be put down. here, he just goes in to lockdown if i have guests that dont fit the appropriate cagegory/
    i am surprised by the way that our thai fighting chicken roos down go for me. hubby says that they never go for people, this breed is just so dog like...
     
  9. chicksooner

    chicksooner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So he was challenging me. Then my other rooster went after my daughter. I had never had an issue with him. Assuming that they smell spring in the air and are acting crazy. We have taken the boys to task for their behavior and they seem to be walking a little wider around us. My one guy will still do his side crazy eye and side step toward me but when I move toward him now he cant get away fast enough. I guess they are pretty easy to correct since they are generally very mild and easy going. I have no problem reminding them who pays the feed bill. [​IMG] With that said I am building some bachelor pens for the roos anyway. Unless they are being used for breeding they are getting solitary confinement until the spring craziness settles down.
     

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