Oh, no.... this is terrible ='(

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by wjallen05, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. wjallen05

    wjallen05 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2008
    North Georgia
    Some of you may have read some posts I made last week about a sick roo that I got from some folks. He has infected the rest of my flock (a few have watery/bubbly eyes, some have no symptoms). (I was unaware that he was sick when I got him... shame on me)
    I took him to the Ga Poultry Lab last Thurs, and all test results came back negative. He did have a respitory virus and staph infection. They sent off to test for what he thought it might be... MG. [​IMG]

    I read up on MG (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS044) and I am 95% sure this is what they have. It says that they are carriers for LIFE. I was supposed to hear back today, but didn't, so I'm sure I'll be getting a call tomorrow. If this is what they have, I'll have to cull my entire flock. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Not only do I have so much money invested in them, but I love them dearly, and some I have raised from chicks that I got last spring.

    WHY?!?!?!? [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2009
  2. crazychicken

    crazychicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 11, 2008
    NC
    first off relax it says they are carriers for life but that does not mean you have to cull them. keep them isolated and away from other chickens do not hatch their eggs. and do not put in new chickens. just make sure if you ever get new ones to keep them far away from them.

    I am no vet or medic just my 2 cents of what I would do

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Synonyms: MG, chronic respiratory disease (CRD), infectious sinusitis, mycoplasmosis

    Species affected: chickens, turkeys, pigeons, ducks, peafowl and passerine birds.

    Clinical signs: Clinical symptoms vary slightly between species. Infected adult chickens may show no outward signs if infection is uncomplicated. However, sticky, serous exudate from nostrils, foamy exudate in eyes, and swollen sinuses can occur, especially in broilers. The air sacs may become infected. Infected birds can develop respiratory rales and sneeze. Affected birds are often stunted and unthrifty (see Table 1 ).

    There are two forms of this disease in the turkey. With the "upper form" the birds have watery eyes and nostrils, the infraorbitals (just below the eye) become swollen, and the exudate becomes caseous and firm. The birds have respiratory rales and show unthriftiness.

    With the "lower form", infected turkeys develop airsacculitis. As with chickens, birds can show no outward signs if the infection is uncomplicated. Thus, the condition may go unnoticed until the birds are slaughtered and the typical legions are seen. Birds with airsacculitis are condemned.

    MG in chicken embryos can cause dwarfing, airsacculitis, and death.

    Transmission: MG can be spread to offspring through the egg. Most commercial breeding flocks, however, are MG-free. Introduction of infected replacement birds can introduce the disease to MG-negative flocks. MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment.

    Treatment : Outbreaks of MG can be controlled with the use of antibiotics. Erythromycin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin all exhibit anti-mycoplasma activity and have given good results. Administration of most of these antibiotics can be by feed, water or injection. These are effective in reducing clinical disease. However, birds remain carriers for life.

    Prevention: Eradication is the best control of mycoplasma disease. The National Poultry Improvement Plan monitors all participating chicken and turkey breeder flocks.
     
  3. Omran

    Omran Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2008
    Bagdad KY
    I am really sorry to hear that about your chickens [​IMG]

    How many birds do you have?

    I know it is so hard to cull them, but some times man has no other choice, anyway all what I can do is keep my finrers crosed for you, and what ever it is at least you will know what is going on.

    10 Days ago I got red of all my SLW (three of them) tow of them were not sick but they never looked strong or getting to be big to me, and one of them was a little sick and had worms, so I isolated her and gave he medicine then I wormed all my flock, but just for my own peace I decided to get red of the slw, because 8 weeks ago I had another 2 SLW ad they died on me, and I swear all my other RIR and my BR are healthy and strong as a bull.

    Best of luck.

    Omran.
     
  4. Laskaland

    Laskaland ThE gRoOvY cHiCkEn

    Aug 2, 2008
    Nebraska
    I culled only the ill ones, after I seperated them from my flock. It was hard. They were all silkies. The rest of my flock is fine. these were all together.
    It's a hard decision, but if you want healthy birds, get rid of the ones showing symptoms, and monitor the rest.
    Christina
    (see my siggy line for the COLDS post)
     
  5. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    One word of advice for others: quarentine! For a minum of 45 days.
     
  6. Laskaland

    Laskaland ThE gRoOvY cHiCkEn

    Aug 2, 2008
    Nebraska
    Quote:No kidding Farmer Kitty! AT THE FIRST SIGN OF GUNK!!!
    christina
     
  7. Missouri chick

    Missouri chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2008
    Homer, GA
    Jamie I'm crossing my fingers and toes for you. I hope you get some good news. [​IMG]
     
  8. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    Quote:No kidding Farmer Kitty! AT THE FIRST SIGN OF GUNK!!!
    christina

    NO-Whenever you get a new bird! DO NOT put a new bird in with your flock without quarentining first! By the time you see gunk it's to late, your flock has been exposed.
     
  9. Laskaland

    Laskaland ThE gRoOvY cHiCkEn

    Aug 2, 2008
    Nebraska
    Quote:No kidding Farmer Kitty! AT THE FIRST SIGN OF GUNK!!!
    christina

    NO-Whenever you get a new bird! DO NOT put a new bird in with your flock without quarentining first! By the time you see gunk it's to late, your flock has been exposed.

    Oh, that's right,too, but I meant for illness [​IMG]
    Anytime you get a new animal- that will mix with others! OR if there is illness detected in a current group.
    Thanks for clarifying that
    Christina
     
  10. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Mar 25, 2008
    Virginia
    It breaks my heart to read this. I went through a similar event this past summer when I brought home a chick that had Infectious Coryza and introduced it to my flock. It was horrible. I was still fairly new to the chicken world and got the chick from someone I trusted, so I did not even think to quarantine before introducing.

    I cannot stress enough how very important it is for people to quarantine new birds, no matter where they come from.

    Please keep us posted as to what you will end up doing with your flock. I am truly sorry that you are having to go through this.
     

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