OK, I am totally new to having chickens, and I have started with 3 hens and 1 rooster, but I think I

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by missnu01, Nov 22, 2012.

  1. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So can I put the hen and chicks with the other chickens, they are in a ridiculously large space, or should I keep the hen and chicks separate. Should I take the chicks from the hen and put them in a brooder? I am lost. Or should I just stick with getting more adult chickens? And leave the chicks for when and if my own chickens and rooster make some of their own? I really want the hen and chicks not only to get the numbers up, but also because then I will know I have a hen that might go broody again in the future. Also, the rooster we got is very old and very very calm, as are all the chickens except the youngest hen, she is flighty, but also the lowest in the pecking order. Anyway some advice would be great before I do something dumb and end up hurting a hen and her chicks.
     
  2. nothingbutbirds

    nothingbutbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i would keep them separated from each other so you can be sure no one gets hurt
    plus since the chicks cant eat layer food because they can get cancer and kidney and liver failure from it and there is not much of a way to give them chick food without them eating layer food
     
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  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Okay, for starters - quarantine is the best policy when bringing in new birds. You don't want the new mama to infect your current flock; even if she doesn't appear ill at the present time.

    The quarantine time will also give the chicks time to get some size on them. Then the new family needs to be introduced in such a way that the resident birds can see the new ones, but can't have physical contact with them. And yes, even then smaller birds will need to be protected for awhile until they are accepted.
     
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  4. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So, could I use a really x-large dog crate as a separate coop until the chickens are all able to be integrated and what not?
     
  5. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    and the thing about the layer food with the chicks does make sense and I hadn't even thought about that.
     
  6. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So how many more things that are super duper important shoudl I know that I feel like I don't know?
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    If the crate is big enough for mama, babies, food, water and a place for mama to get off the nest, so she doesn't soil her nest, then yes. Trips out for some fresh air and sunshine would be very beneficial.
    When I have hens brooding chicks within the flock - in other words, when mama is a part of the flock and hatches chicks in the coop, I solve the feed problem by feeding a flockraiser-type feed; in other words, a feed appropriate for all ages of poultry. With oyster shell on the side for the laying hens that need the calcium, I've found it to be a simple solution to the feed issue. A creep feeder is another solution for the feed issue. You can do a search here on BYC about creep feeders.
     
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  8. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well I got the hen, and only 7 chicks...they said one had gone missing...it's funny because I can assume the missing one was gray because the chicks coloring seems to be in 2s. 2 are checkered, 2 are brown, 2 are white, and one is gray...lol. They are fully feathered, and look the size and shape of pigeons...Everything seems to be going well...the mama hen is really small, the chicks are almost her size already, but she is still keeping them under her, which is funny looking...it is more like she is just climbing on the backs of the babies...
     

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