Ok which one of you is the ROOSTER!?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Lanae203, Jul 5, 2016.

  1. Lanae203

    Lanae203 New Egg

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    This morning (early morning) I heard a rooster crow. It woke me up and I thought "that rooster sounds awful close to our house." Then it hit me. Oh no! We have a rooster! It was a really odd sounding rooster crow. Sort of like he's still developing it. But I can't tell which one is the rooster. How do I tell w/out catching him in the act of crowing? Then my second question is, what do I do with him? I wouldn't mind hatching chicks next spring but do I keep him in w/ the hens now? Do I need to separate him? Should I find him a new home? Will he be mean to my hens? What if he and the other Americauna are siblings? Does that matter? Will he fertilize eggs and does that affect the ones we want to eat? I've attached a couple photos here. I think it's one of the Americaunas (sp?) but the only difference I see in them is a slight one w/ their tail feathers. Any insight would be great. Thank you!


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  2. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Both of the Americaunas are cockerels "boys"
     
  3. silkiecuddles

    silkiecuddles FortheLoveofSilkies

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    The two in the middle pic both look like cocks to me you can leave him/them with the hens. They will fertilize the eggs, but you can still eat them (eggs). You just may want to crack your eggs separately ;)
     
  4. 235chickens

    235chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With my chickens
    both
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2016
  5. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Keep them if you want, don't if you don't. Yes you can keep them with the hens. No you don't have to separate them. Sibling roosters generally get along very well with each other. They rarely "mean" to hens, but will start breeding them in a few months. Its doesn't matter that they are siblings with the hens, you won't get mutant chicks. Only with many, many, many generations of inbreeding will you start running into trouble. Yes they will fertilize the eggs. No it won't hurt you to eat them. If you pick eggs daily or even every other day you won't be able to notice they are fertilized. Chicks will only develop if fertile eggs are incubated.
     
  6. lomine

    lomine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You may want to check your local laws before deciding. Many people, like myself, can't have roosters within city limits.
     
  7. TheKindaFarmGal

    TheKindaFarmGal Chicken Obsessed

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    Agree with the others. Both definitely boys, and very pretty.
     
  8. IsaacK

    IsaacK Out Of The Brooder

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    My thoughts exactly. And also agree with checking local laws if you are in a town. Some places you can't have the roos because they crow and disturb others. If you have enough hens, you probably wont run into trouble, otherwise you might end up with half bald hens lol. Ive seen that happen to some folks who have way to many roosters or not enough hens because the hens get bred to frequently. Also, you may notice a little fleck in some fertilized eggs when you crack them. There is nothing wrong with that also, it wont hurt anything. :) Those are some pretty boys too, enjoy!
     
  9. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Both are beautiful boys
     
  10. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sorry to say, you got 2 Cockerels (middle pic).
     

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