Ok who knows their genetics?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by yotetrapper, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm confused. Black is dominant, and white recessive, right? So a crossing of E/E (black) chickens and c/c (white) chickens should result in 100% black, right? Or am I already wrong?

    If I'm right, then here is where I get confused. There's also a dominant white (I/I). What would an I/I crossed to a E/E produce? It would be 100% I/E, but just what color would I/E appear as??

    Also, how would one determine a) if a white is I/I or c/c? and b) whether a black chicken is a true E/E or a variation of blue, or whatever else??
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  2. greenthumb89

    greenthumb89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    firstly it depends on the chicks breed to tell what is dominant and what is recessiv, next you have to know what codimance would play a part in the offspring. over all its a trial and error unless you know that parent genetics from offspring testing.
     
  3. greenthumb89

    greenthumb89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    and those E/E chickens could actually be E/c and they would look black but be recessive white so if your bred 2 other those together you could get 25% EE 25% cc and 50%Ec its mainly a guessing game because of all the possible color combinations and the possible co-dominance and the possible over ruling colors that can always take effect


    pretty sure this applies to chickens but it does apply to cats, thats what i studied in school anyway. feel free to correct me anyone that has more knowledge in this field
     
  4. seriousbill

    seriousbill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are three main chicken genes that look "white": Dominant white (I), Recessive white (c), and Silver (S) (which is sex-linked). You need to know which one(s) you're working with, because they all express differently, and they also all depend on what else you're working with. Dominant white tends to express itself, but it is leaky and will show other colors through. Recessive white has to come from both parents to show and gives a cleaner white. Silver usually won't show in the presence of black, but it is dominant over red. Anybody feel free to correct any of this if I've got it wrong, but that's my understanding.
     
  5. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    [​IMG]:confused::confused::confused::confused: I'm already confused, HaHa
     
  6. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, but what would an E/I E/I chicken look like? White with black splotches? Gray? Black with white spots? Since Black and Dom White are both dominant, which would win out, or.... how would they combine I wonder?

    I'm curious about what an F1 cross between a black silkie, and a white cochin would look like. I dont know anything about the prior breeding of either of them, and have no way of knowing what sort of white gene the cochin has.
     
  7. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a question sorta related to this... I have 3 pure white chicks that came out of some combination of Buff Orpington, RIR crossed with Plymouth Rock, and some pure blue-black chickens of unidentified breed. One of the black chickens is sprinkled with white around its neck.

    What could these pure white chicks be from? They're not yellowish like the Buff Orpington chicks.
     
  8. seriousbill

    seriousbill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well, Silkies are also Melanotic, so that'd muddy the waters even more. I just don't know what extended black and dominant white would look like in all the combos, probably a lot of dirty white or gray with black speckles [​IMG] . But I do know that they're not alleles, so you could have E/E and I/I or E/e+, I/i+ so again, the overall color would depend on the number of copies of each gene. Maybe someone with more genetics expertise will chime in [​IMG]
     
  9. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ahh to heck with this genetics stuff lol. I'll just breed em and see what comes out lol.
     

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