Oldest American chicken breeds?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Bullitt, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is there a list of say the 10 oldest American chicken breeds? Or can someone create a list here?

    I know the first two oldest breeds.

    1. Dominique -- Know as "Pilgrim Fowl" and was around for many years before being accepted by the APA in 1874.

    2. Java -- Considered the second-oldest American breed and fist mentioned in print in 1835. But it was not accepted by the APA until 1883. The white, black, and mottled varieties were all accepted by the APA in 1883, but white was removed in 1910 because it looked too much like the White Plymouth Rock.


    Plymouth Rock was accepted by the APA in 1874. This may be the third-oldest American chicken breed.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  2. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    Rapa Nui... about a thousand years old
     
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  3. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I recognize that as the same name as Easter Island, right? I understand Polynesians brought chickens from Asia to South America.

    When I say American, I mean from the United States. I know there are North, Central, and South America.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Perhaps you need to rephrase your original question? WERE there any chickens native to North America? Or were they all imported by settlers? And if not, WHY were there chickens in South American, but not North?
     
  5. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just did clarify my question. I am talking about the United States. This is not complicated.

    There were chickens in South America because Polynesians brought chickens there. There were no chickens in what is now the United States before Europeans brought chickens.

    There is a Prairie Chicken, but that is a different animal.
     
  6. cgmccary

    cgmccary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Probably the first breed brought to the United States was the White-Faced Black Spanish. If you are talking about the first breed in the American Class, (first to be created in the U.S. so to speak),then the honor would go to the Dominique.
     
  7. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, I am referring to breeds of chickens created in the United States.

    As I mentioned, the first two are Dominique and Java. I was hoping others could either add to the list or point me to a list of oldest American breeds.
     
  8. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    You might try GoogleBooks and read the very old poultry magazines. Just a thought. How bout Buckeyes? Not oldest but made in America. Some of the old general "Poultry Book" breed encyclopedias might help. How about the dunghill fowl? I am not sure if it is a landrace or a breed but at least one person breeding them in the US.
    THE AMERICAN BREEDS OF POULTRY
    THEIR ORIGIN, HISTORY OF THEIR DEVELOP-
    MENT, THE WORK OF CONSTRUCTIVE
    BREEDERS AND HOW TO MATE
    EACH OF THE VARIETIES
    FOR BEST RESULTS

    BY
    FRANK L. PL ATT
    Published By
    AMERICAN POULTRY JOURNAL
    Chicago. Illinois 1921

    http://books.google.com/books?id=JN...Ru4G4Bw&ved=0CDYQ6AEwATgU#v=onepage&q&f=false
    See pages 231 and 236. The Dominique is the oldest American breed.
    It appears Mr. Platt has written the origin of each breed in the chapter on that breed. instead of making a actual list.

    Best,
    Karen

    ===============================
    Breeding Dunghill Fowl
    Follow our journey to continue the breeding of the Dominique as well as cross/back breed to recreate the old Dungill Fowl
    https://www.facebook.com/VNSSEED
    http://vnsseed.com/html/dunghill_fowl.html
    ===========================
    Dunghill Fowl
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/310622/dunghill-fowl
    ====================
    Dunghill fowl July 12th, 2013 by KM Wall
    http://blogs.plimoth.org/pilgrimseasonings/?p=5104
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2013
  9. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, I could start researching each breed and finding out the history in order to compile a list of oldest breeds of chickens from the United States. But I was hoping someone might know where I could find a list.

    The dunghill fowl is the name for mixed chickens that were seen on farms in the 1800s. This is not a breed, so you see a wide variety of looks of chickens called dunghill fowl. This is probably what you would get after a couple of generations with a mixed flock of chickens.

    "The Buckeye was first bred and developed in 1896, by a Warren, Ohio resident named Nettie Metcalf." So I am sure Buckeye would be on a list of 10 oldest U.S. breeds. I am just not sure where it would fit on the list.

    Plymouth Rock was first established as a breed in 1849. So I am thinking Plymouth Rock is number 3 on my list.

    Here is what I have so far.


    1. Dominique -- Know as "Pilgrim Fowl" and was around for many years before being accepted by the APA in 1874.

    2. Java -- Considered the second-oldest American breed and fist mentioned in print in 1835. But it was not accepted by the APA until 1883. The white, black, and mottled varieties were all accepted by the APA in 1883, but white was removed in 1910 because it looked too much like the White Plymouth Rock. Some incorrectly state that the breed came from Java when only some of the foundation stock came from Java. The Livestock Conservancy states, "The Java is considered the second oldest breed of chicken developed in America."

    3. Plymouth Rock: The Plymouth Rock was developed in New England in the middle of the 19th century and was first exhibited as a breed in 1849. Plymouth Rock was accepted by the APA in 1874. (There are many color varieties.)

    4. Wyandotte: The first examples of the breed appeared in 1870s. The Silver Laced Wyandotte was developed in New York in the early 1870s and was admitted to the APA in 1883. Other color varieties were admitted by the APA later.

    5. Rhode Island White: The Rhode Island White originated in 1888 through the efforts of Mr. J. Alonzo Jocoy of Peacedale, Rhode Island. He developed the breed by crossing White Wyandottes with Partridge Cochins and Rose Comb White Leghorns. In 1903, Mr. Jocoy made the breed known to the public and offered individuals for sale. The breed continued to be developed and improved so that it more closely resembled the Rhode Island Red’s brick-like body shape. This distinctive shape helped to prevent the breed from looking similar to and being confused with White Wyandottes or White Plymouth Rock chickens. In 1922 the Rhode Island White was admitted to the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection during the national conference in Knoxville, Tennessee, that year. (Wow, I thought the Rhode Island Red was first.)

    6. Jersey Giant: The breed started in the late 1800s. The Black Jersey Giant was admitted into the APA in 1922. The White Jersey Giant was admitted by the APA in 1947.

    7. "The Buckeye was first bred and developed in 1896, by a Warren, Ohio resident named Nettie Metcalf." The Buckeye was admitted to the APA in 1904. "Contrary to popular belief the Buckeye breed was created before the Rhode Island Red breed and actually sent birds to the RIR breeders for them to improve their breed."

    8. Rhode Island Red: Establishment of the Rhode Island Red must have started after 1896. Rhode Island Red was admitted to the APA in 1904.

    9. New Hampshire: The New Hampshire originated starting with Rhode Island Reds and using selective breeding. New Hampshire was admitted by the APA in 1935.

    10. Holland: Despite its name, this breed was developed in the United States starting in the 1930s. The White and Barred Holland were developed simultaneously. This breed looks much like a Plymouth Rock but lays white eggs. Holland was admitted to the APA in 1949.


    Okay, that took some time to do.

    Did I get this list right or did I miss any earlier breeds from the United States?
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2013
  10. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    I don't see Wyandottes mentioned.
     

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