omlet v. non-electrified poultry netting (kencove or premier)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by heiditam, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. heiditam

    heiditam Chillin' With My Peeps

    275
    8
    73
    Aug 8, 2014
    Hello!

    I am wondering which netting is least likely to be chewed and damaged by rabbits or foxes. I will not be using this as predator control, just confining them to area around coop when I clean it or for part of the day. The coop is very secure at night, and we will be free ranging during day. It is taking longer than I hoped to coop train, however, and they need to get out and I don't have a run.

    I was going to just go buy an omlet to surround them, but I read that rabbits chew holes in it! We have a plethora of adorable rabbits around here. :)

    Would the kencove or premier fence be hardier to a rabbits knawing, if it is NOT electrified?

    I like that all fences are easy to put up, have step in posts. One advantage to the electric is that if I decide to go electric later on, I have it already.

    I *do* like the idea of electric, but...we have so many small kids-I will forget to turn it off as they are in and out of the house all the time-they will get shocked, but maybe when they are older...


    Anyhow...basic Q is will the non-electrified poultry net prevent a chew through?
     
  2. heiditam

    heiditam Chillin' With My Peeps

    275
    8
    73
    Aug 8, 2014
    And if I leave gate open on either fencing will rabbits or foxes be smart enough to enter through opening instead of chewing fence?
     
  3. thomasboyle

    thomasboyle Chillin' With My Peeps

    912
    183
    146
    Feb 28, 2013
    Northwest Hills of CT
    I have the Premier netting, and it is not very thick, so if not electrified, it could be chewed through fairly easily.

    We have taught all the kids, nieces and nephews not to touch the electric fence. Trust me, if they test it (and some have, just to see), they won't volunteer to do it again! But I have it hooked up to a fairly strong charger, as I am trying to keep out bears, bobcats, coyotes and other large pests, and the fence reads 8000 volts. If you were to use a smaller, less powerful charger (power is measured in joules), the shock would not be nearly as bad, but should keep rabbits from chewing on the string. Very important, make sure whatever charger you buy, it pulses, that is provides a shock about once per second. This allows whatever touches the fence to get shocked, and then be able to move away. Do not use a continuous charger. Also, if your children are too young to walk, they should not be anywhere near an electric fence. A toddler who is unstable could fall into the net, get tangled up, and that would not be good. But anyone old enough to walk on their own should have no problem with the electric fence.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by