? on getting a higher humidity

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by dustponds10, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. dustponds10

    dustponds10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I can only get my humidity up to around 60 in my incubator I want to get it around 65 to 70. Is there a product out there I can buy to make more surface area for more exposure of water to create more humidity? My chicks have had a tough time because of stickiness. Any help will help. Dustin
     
  2. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    On the MN prairie.
    You could put a damp sponge in there, or a shallow dish with water.
     
  3. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    60% is plenty high enough at lockdown. Too high humidity will 'drown' the chicks. If you still want to to increase humidity, Thick wet wash cloths in the bator will help. Consider using the dry incubation method. It's all that many of us use with great success.
     
  4. dustponds10

    dustponds10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you could please explain the dry method to me that makes sence I would gladly try. Only problem right now is I have around 500 dollars of Genetic hackle chickens in the bator. I had a very bad hatch last time with around 55 to 60 with sticky chicks that stuck in the shells. That is why I ask the question. They are just set a few days ago so i have time to figure it out but I really dont want to loose the eggs or the majority of them any ways.
     
  5. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's quite simple. No water at all is added until lockdown. Humidity for the first 18 days maintains at around 30-35%. At lockdown, I add warm water to cover the bottom of the bator. I've found that I get sticky chicks if I open the bator too much during "lockdown". I used the typical incubation when I first started hatching and had mixed results. I tried dry incubation and will not go back. I even use it for ducks and geese which is controversial but has worked well for me. Another way to check if the egg is maintaining well, is to note the size of the air cell. Using the search option, search 'dry incubation' and 'air cell size'.
     
  6. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Depending on your climate your humidity in incubator most likely wont maintain 30% without water. I agree with the lower humidity incubation but most people have to add water to keep 30-40% first 18 days. I use a shot glass to maintain. During lock down a small tumbler gets me to 60%. I've not played with covering part of the bottom water trays with aluminum for less humidity yet and don't have turners so by glass size works for me, size of water trays doesn't for me. You need humidity just not the high amounts some sources recommend (read of 60% then up to 75% and that's just too high). What it takes you in your climate, that time of year, your home heating source, if you use a humidifier or dehumidifier is all case dependent. There is no "dry" hatching but definitely a dryer incubation method. Majority of BYC'ers will say that is 30-40% (don't worry if it drys out for a day now and then) and 55-60% last three days. Calibrate your hygrometer with a salt test.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012

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