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Only one hen?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by momofthehouse, Feb 28, 2014.

  1. momofthehouse

    momofthehouse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So we found out the hard way that our dog will go after the chickens. We learned our lesson so please don't scold us. We are new to this and these two hens were left at the house we bought. Anyways my question is do I need another hen ? Will the one left get lonely? I read you shouldn't bring in any new flock and I do not have quarantine room currently so what should I do? What will happen is she is all alone or can I bring in a friend?
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    Sorry for your loss! You're not alone here; a poll ranked dogs as the worst predator.

    They are flock animals and do better with one or two companions. If you can find one or two mature hens from a source you consider reliable, you could take a chance on the quarantine issue. Not a great idea, but there are people I would take a bird from that I wouldn't worry about quarantine.

    They will squabble at first for pecking order rights, but with some distraction (space, hiding places, treats) hopefully it will go well enough.
     
  3. momofthehouse

    momofthehouse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks yeah I though about a big nice special treat would help ha! Any ideas on a nice treat?
     
  4. momofthehouse

    momofthehouse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    This is the current coop so not slot of space but they free ranged all day.
     
  5. GuppyTJ

    GuppyTJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If they free range, they should do fine, with or without a treat. They'll have lots to do, pecking about as they free range and they'll have places to run as they work out the pecking order. Maybe you want to get a few more so you have some spares? I find it's easier to get a few at a time so if the unforeseen illness takes one or a predator takes another, I don't have to do yet another introduction. Just a thought.

    Guppy
     
  6. momofthehouse

    momofthehouse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks I'm off to get two friends and a roo. Got some meal worms :)
     
  7. momofthehouse

    momofthehouse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So far so good my plan worked :)
     
  8. ScottyChic

    ScottyChic Chillin' With My Peeps

    As a nice treat - I suggest you dig up some worms - our hens go crazy for them

    Of course where you live, you may have snow - making that impossible. In the UK we buy 'dried mealworms' - they love them.

    Apples(without the seeds) usually go down well - or bananas. Perhaps raisins too.

    Blueberries are another favourite - can be expensive though.

    Some hens are fussy, so it's trial and error.

    Good Luck.
     
  9. ScottyChic

    ScottyChic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Of course hens can find worms on their own- but if you dig quite far down - you get to the large juicy ones.
     
  10. GuppyTJ

    GuppyTJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You may want to watch out for feeding them earth worms as worms are an intermediary transmitter of gape worms. Chickens will eat the occasional worm that they find on their own but feeding them a lot of worms increases their chance of contracting gape. Perhaps do a search here in BYC on this and you'll find that many experienced flocksters discourage purposefully feeding chickens earth worms.

    Guppy
     

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