Oops, it's a rooster..

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by mlnorfleet, Nov 15, 2016.

  1. mlnorfleet

    mlnorfleet New Egg

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    We have a small backyard garden with chicken coop. The coop is large enough for 6. We had 4 hens that were not getting along great, it looked like one was broody, so the feed store said to slip baby chicks under her. So then we had 6. But the others kept picking on the broody one (now momma), so we got a second coop for momma & babies. The coops are side by side.

    I realize today that one of the babies is a rooster (oops, sorry neighbors). I understand that roosters keep the peace between the hens.

    Should I just put the momma & babies back in with the others for the winter & let the rooster do his job? Or get rid of the rooster??
     
  2. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's really your decision whether to keep a rooster or not. Most everyone agrees that there are fewer problems if you don't have a rooster. Your neighbors might no appreciate the crowing. So if you don't want to grow your own chicks then the rooster is not necessary. Some roosters do help keep the hens under control. Other roosters are just in it for the sex. Some roosters get very aggressive toward people. I culled my only rooster in July when it attacked several people including me, my grandson, the neighbor, and the house sitter. The hens don't miss him at all. His favorite hen that had a bare back just grew in new feathers in the past month and is finally looking nice. I only miss the cock-a-doodle-do so am getting a rooster from my neighbor that seems to be one of the non aggressive ones.
     
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  3. RodNTN

    RodNTN Following Jesus

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  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC.
    When you say the coop is "large enough for 6" - what are the actual dimensions of the coop? I ask as many of the pre-fab units, etc are marketed with grossly overstated capacity and overcrowding is often at the root of issues such as you had been encountering with the original group of four.....additionally, if that was the issue then the addition of more birds, of either gender, is not going to help. Having a better idea of the sort of setup you are working with can better predict the success/failure of integrating your birds.
    I would not rely on a young cockerel to restore or maintain any sort of peace in an established flock -- this little guy is not equipped yet for that job even in the best of circumstances and it is more likely his presence will add to, not decrease, the chaos.
    Do you live within any sort of city limit, HOA, etc where a rooster may be prohibited?
     
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  5. N F C

    N F C doo be doo be doo Premium Member

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    The previous greeters have made some valid points about your flock so I'll just say hello and thanks for joining us!
     
  6. mlnorfleet

    mlnorfleet New Egg

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    Nov 15, 2016
    Hi,

    We are permitted one rooster.
    No HOA.
    Coop is 5x5 + 3 large nesting boxes protruding.
    Yard is 10x5.

    I've had them all out grazing in the garden today without incident, I was kind of wanting not to have to figure out how to warm the 2nd coop, or I would leave well enough alone. It's smaller & harder to configure a bulb in.

    Thanks for all of your advice. :) I'm just a year in, so I'm winging it.
     
  7. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Where do you live that you feel the coop needs heated? My girls were fine last winter down to -12. Others around the forums have had even colder weather without the need to provide heat. The chickens were happy and outside in their run every day as the food and water is in the run. To stay warm a chicken needs a dry coop which means you need proper ventilation. Warm air rises thereby removing the moisture from their breathing and pooping. You need vents up high to get that warm, moist air out of the coop or chickens could be subject to frostbite.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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  9. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    Greetings from Kansas and [​IMG]! Great to have you in our flock! Best wishes and thanks for joining BYC! [​IMG]
     
  10. mlnorfleet

    mlnorfleet New Egg

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    Hi & thanks for all your help. We're in Colorado. Last year we ran a light bulb out there in the yard at night & used insulated sheeting around the yard to keep the snow & wind out. We have a heated base for their water container as well. Food is in the house because if not, the rats rob it empty.
     

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