Oops, she's a cockerel! So many questions...

Discussion in 'Games, Jokes, and Fun!' started by Ruby Rivers, Jul 28, 2014.

  1. Ruby Rivers

    Ruby Rivers In the Brooder

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    Our Silkie, Fluff, has turned out male (the crowing should have given it away) and he's courting/courted our Bantam-Cochin, Beryl. The rest of the flock are four larger, standard layers. Here's the thing ... Beryl has become broody and we would like her to raise a chick. How do we handle this? Do we need to separate Beryl and/or chick ? If not, how do we retrieve the rest of the daily eggs? Will the others be ok with the new addition? :eek:/ Thanks for any advice.


    [​IMG]

    Beryl " #scarlettjohanssoning '
     
  2. troy4

    troy4 Songster

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    dont do anything.Let her sit and let nature take its course.Don't get involved or she'll moved.Just stick your hand under her get the eggs.All you need to do is buy a chick or just let her hatch.Buying a chick prevents from babies being hatched in eggs and getting more chicks then you wanted.

    At first they will be curious and soon enough probably attack.The mother wont let them kill it,but meet it.If they begin to get too nosy and start picking at she will puff up and fight.at the end some say it ends a Blood bath well its a lie.The mother knows exactly what to do and if she does not what them looking or touching she will Growl,puff up, and eventually go back to the nest and sit on her chick.

    Well the daily eggs other hens are laying wont get in the nest with her well they might.I've had a hen named Mrs.broody try hatching about 20 eggs.Hens kept laying in her nest.

    Well it really depends on how the flock thinks.A new addition is a threat sometimes.Most animal dads kill their young.Well I'd suppose the rooster would kill the chick if its a rooster.So in other words don't let him see the chick.Mother cannot fight the rooster.She'll be hurt at the end.She will keep the chick in there until it grows wings.So you may not have to worry.Unless its a slow chick and cant fly then gives the rooster a better advantage.

    Hope I helped!

    Troy 4
     
  3. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    It is generally a good idea to separate them in my opinion. Not only will the rooster bother her, and possibly kill the chicks once they hatch, but your other hens will try and lay eggs where she is sitting and disturb her as well. Broody hens can be moved at night pretty successfully into a new location. Something as simple as a rubber tub with mesh on top is good enough to keep them happy. That way she can sit in peace.

    I have had many broody hens and leaving them with the rest of the flock is pretty much guaranteeing that you will lose some of the chicks-- no matter how good of a mother the hen is. Chickens are not like people, they will attack and kill their own kind.

    If you chose not to separate them you can mark her eggs with a pencil and collect the rest daily.

    I would give her at least three or four eggs to sit on, even if you only want one chick as the chances of them all hatching are slim. Even so, I would make sure that there are at least two chicks. They don't like to be alone.
     
  4. troy4

    troy4 Songster

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    Well even if they want 1 chick all you need to do is buy 1 and she 'll quit sitting.So it all happens.All the mother wants is to hatch at least a chick.
     
  5. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    Yes, so the mother will be happy. What about the chick?

    It won't have any hatch mates to grow up with, and when the mother abandons it at 6-8 weeks old it will be completely alone. You can't introduce it into the flock at that age if you don't want it to be picked on by the other birds. And what if it dies after a few days? Then the mother hen loses her only chick.

    My argument is simply to have at least two or three chicks. If you only want one then sell the rest when they are older, you'll also have a much better chance of getting a pullet in the batch if you do it that way.
     
  6. troy4

    troy4 Songster

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    Well now I understand,but what are the others gonna do to help?Aha there.So there really is no use for another chick.But they could buy like 1 more and then sell it.I can see your point,but it will only need play mates for a few days.Mother can Introduce him/her to the flock and there will be a settlement and they wont attack.The other chicks won't stick with each other for long at 8 weeks.And why would it die?It may get killed,but still there really would not be any use for a another my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2014
  7. troy4

    troy4 Songster

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    What would a chick do to help the other if it got attacked?The only thing that would help is to let mother take her course and then just reintroduce the chick later if it gets hurt.
     
  8. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    Ultimately it is up to Ruby Rivers to decide how many chicks or eggs to get, but that is my experience in the eight years that I have kept poultry. I have made my point, there's nothing left to say.
     
  9. troy4

    troy4 Songster

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    Yes true its up to her.
     
  10. Ruby Rivers

    Ruby Rivers In the Brooder

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    Thanks for the advice, guys.
     

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