Goosebaby

Crowing
Nov 10, 2019
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Wheezing, gurgling, coughing, head shaking, diarrhea, problems swallowing their feed, dizzyness, neck and head scratching, general weakness. Some days breathng with open beaks.

It was the same for the rooster.

But the symptoms varied, some days they were a bit better than others.

That sounds similar to Roxby’s symptoms, though I just did a physical exam on him and of two of my other ganders for comparison to him, his grandfather and his uncle.

Both of them have squishy abdomens, nothing stands out really feeling around in there.

Roxby on the other hand has what feels like an egg in there sticking out below his hip bones, and he is 100% a gander.
In other words it’s a swollen air sack, an air sack that’s pushed out of place, his liver or intestine is enlarged or some other organ is, or he has an egg sized mass in there.

Without an X-ray it’s hard to say what it is but that doesn’t feel right.😞
 

LaFleche

Meadow Devil
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Sep 22, 2012
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So, when did you last deworm him and what dosage and for how many days?

Worms can also cause inflammation and an entangled mass of worms can even cause an obstruction.
 
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LaFleche

Meadow Devil
Premium Feather Member
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From the MSDvet manual :

"The gapeworm Syngamus trachea
inhabits the trachea and lungs of many domestic and various wild birds. Infection may occur directly by ingestion of infective eggs or larvae; however, severe field infection is associated with ingestion of transport hosts such as earthworms, snails, slugs, and arthropods (eg, flies). Many gapeworm larvae may encyst and survive within a single invertebrate for years. Although gapeworms are not a problem in confinement-reared poultry, they cause serious economic losses in game-farm pens and in range-reared chickens, pheasants, turkeys, and peacocks. Cyathostoma bronchialis is the gapeworm that infects geese and ducks.

Fenbendazole is approved for chickens and turkeys in the USA against Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum when administered in the drinking water at a dosage of 1 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days. It is has also been shown to be effective against Ascaris spp. when administered once at 10–50 mg/kg; if needed the treatment can be repeated after 10 days. At 10–50 mg/kg, fenbendazole when administered daily over 5 days is effective against Capillaria. Fenbendazole is also effective against other nematodes when administered at 10–50 mg/kg/day for 3–5 days or as a single dosage of 20–100 mg/kg, or when added to the drinking water at 125 mg/L for 5 days or to the feed at 100 mg/kg. At 20 mg/kg for 3–4 days, it effectively removes gapeworms in pheasants. Toxicity has been reported in pigeons that received fenbendazole at the rate of 30 mg/kg for 5 days. Fenbendazole should not be administered during molt, because it may interfere with feather regrowth.
(Source: https://www.msdvetmanual.com/poultry/helminthiasis/helminthiasis-in-poultry#v3341937)

You could try again using a different dewormer this time:

"Tetramisole at 40 mg/kg, flubendazole at 30 ppm in feed, and ivermectin 1% at 10 mg/mL in water were effective in removing A galli, H gallinarum, and Capillaria spp in chickens. Tetramisole at 3.6 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days in the drinking water removes gapeworms. Poultry treated while larvae are migrating in the body develop immunity to gapeworms, even though therapy may abort larval migration."

Flubendazole and ivermectin will treat gapeworms as well.
 

LaFleche

Meadow Devil
Premium Feather Member
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0.23 mL per pound for five days starting November 6.
Did you mean 0.23 mg per pound dissolved in 1 litre of water?

If so, this might have not been enough, depending on the formula strenght you used. And he might not have drank/ ingested enough on his own because of the taste.

How did you administer it?
 
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Goosebaby

Crowing
Nov 10, 2019
1,987
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Northern California
Did you mean 0.23 mg per pound dissolved in 1 litre of water?

If so, this might have not been enough, depending on the formula strenght you used. And he might not have drank/ ingested enough on his own because of the taste.

How did you administer it?
It was mililiters, I suctioned it out of the syringe with another syringe to get the exact dose and shot it down his throat.
 
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Goosebaby

Crowing
Nov 10, 2019
1,987
2,590
326
Northern California
The first day I worked him I did find these weird black things in his droppings, but I never saw them again after that. He continued to gape the rest of the month except the last three days when he also felt better, but like I said he seems to have worsened again.

0C494D06-0EA1-479A-8A2B-09DDF23DAD16.jpeg F9662501-AE57-4CA9-B85E-3E1E2221B1D5.jpeg

The only other worker I have on hand besides the safeguard is ivermectin and albendazole
 

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