OPEN MOUTH BREATHING

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kateklaire, May 4, 2009.

  1. kateklaire

    kateklaire Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 29, 2009
    Hi,
    One of my hens (about 6 months old) has started breathing open mouthed at times. She has no other apparent symptoms. Her comb and wattles are fine, eyes fine, nothing around the nose, no akward body movement.
    I did have to put a hen down who had Mareks in this same flock.

    this hen does not appear or sound like she is having trouble breathing except for the sometimes open mouth. I live in Berkeley CA so it's not because she's hot.

    any thooughts would be appreciated!!
    Thanks,
    KAte
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2009
  2. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are her comb and wattles turning bluish?

    As you may know, Marek's is extremely common, but not all birds will succumb to symptoms. While it is possible (likely) she carries it, it could also be respiratory.

    You might search Oxine, or you are welcome to read my now-common spiel below - - I feel strongly about this product's uses for sanitizing and respiratory issues, so here's my basic scoop----------------------


    I recommend keeping Oxine (chlorine dioxide). You may mist your coop or brooder with this stuff when you have the odd sneeze or wheeze, and as long as you mix the proper ratio you won't hurt them one bit.

    Here's some recommended reading:

    What is Oxine (chlorine dioxide)--
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorine_dioxide

    Oxine poultry uses--
    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/oxine.htm
    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/page11.htm

    And here's where I buy my Oxine--
    http://www.firststatevetsupply.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=294

    I keep Oxine at Miss Theodore's recommended coop misting dilution in a quart spray bottle set to fine mist. When I have respiratory issues I lightly mist morning and evening in the coop.
     
  3. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    another possibility is gapeworm.
     
  4. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Ah! I had forgotten about that, Diane. OP, can you try shining a flashlight toward her mouth and see if you can see anything that looks like white threads doen in her throat? or white tinged with red? Don't know if you can always tell, perhaps Diane or another experienced person can give more info.


    I recall back in 2008 Cuda had recommended thiabendazole or levamisole for gapeworm, but here's some other info on this from the very helpful MS State University ag site:

    http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/disparas.htm

    "Gapeworms

    The gapeworm (Syngamus trachea) is a round red worm that attach to the trachea (windpipe) of birds and causes the disease referred to as "gapes". The term describes the open-mouth breathing characteristic of gapeworm-infected birds. Heavily infected birds usually emit a grunting sound because of the difficulty in breathing and many die from suffocation. The worms can easily block the trachea, so they are particularly harmful to young birds.

    The gapeworm is sometimes designated as the "red-worm"; or "forked-worm" because of its red color and because the male and female are joined in permanent copulation. They appear like the letter Y. The female is the larger of the two and is one-fourth to one inch in length. The male gapeworm may attain a length of one-fourth inch. Both sexes attach to the lining of the trachea with their mouthparts. Sufficient numbers may accumulate in the trachea to hinder air passage.

    The life cycle of the gapeworm is similar to that of the cecal worm; the parasite can be transmitted when birds eat embryonated worm eggs or earthworms containing the gapeworm larvae. The female worm lays eggs in the trachea, the eggs are coughed up, swallowed, and pass out in the droppings. Within eight to fourteen days the eggs embryonate and are infective when eaten by birds or earthworms. The earthworm, snails and slugs serve as primary intermediate hosts for the gapeworm. Gapeworms in infected earthworms remain viable for four and a half years while those in snails and slugs remain infective for one year. After being consumed by the bird, gapeworm larvae hatch in the intestine and migrate from the intestine to the trachea and lungs.

    Gapeworms infect chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, pheasants, chukar partridge, and probably other birds. Young birds reared on soil of infected range pens are at high risk (pen-raised game birds). Some control or reduction in infection density (worms/bird) is achieved by alternating the use of range pens every other year and/or using a pen for only one brood each year. Tilling the soil in the pens at the end of the growing season helps to reduce the residual infection. Treating the soil to eliminate earthworms, snails and slugs is possible but the cost is usually prohibitive.

    Gapeworms are best prevented by administering a wormer at fifteen to thirty day intervals or including a drug at low levels continuously beginning fifteen days after birds are placed in the infected pens. One drug that is effective for eliminating gapeworms is fenbendazole, however, its use is not presently approved for use in birds by the Food and Drug Administration."


    I do keep Fenbendazole in my collection, as there are a couple of types of worms that do not respond to some of the other meds. However, you might do a bit of research on this first. This is just one other possibility for your hen.

    Please keep us posted!
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2009
  5. kateklaire

    kateklaire Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 29, 2009
    Thanks for your considerations. I looked into her throat and did not see anything but will try again later when i have 4 hands and eyes.
    She does not have a bluish comb or wattle(s).

    What about Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth? The reason I ask is I have not had any luck today in finding a supplier with Flubenvet. Any other recommendations? I am reluctant to search for the recommended (?) not approved by the fda. i did find ivernet for horses not too far away (oral). can i give that? anyone know the recommended dosage? oh, and i will try to find these other two recommended.
    thanks
    where would i find oxine?
    I will follow up with apple cider vinegar and garlic in their water.

    could it be that she just has a cold?
     

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