ordering chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by seminolewind, Feb 29, 2008.

  1. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I have been reading alot of "dead shipped chicks" posts. I just have some food for thought. It is very cold in places this time of year. I was dying to order some chicks, but then I thought of how cold it could be, certainly not any where around 90 degrees! So I wouldn't think of ordering this time of year. Heating pad or not, I feel it's just not warm enough.
    The other thing I'd like to mention is that I hatched a bunch of chicks last year, the group was "eating" so I thought. Turns out they were just picking at the crumbles! So I made the wet mash and they pigged out like they hadn't eaten in days (duh). Then I grinded the crumbles down finer. I was paying attention to their eating because I had one surviving chick a month before that, and he acted like he was starving. Well he was. And he died. He too would pick at the crumbles and wasn't really eating them.
    I hate seeing chicks die from something that could be prevented.
     
  2. mhoward92

    mhoward92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes thats sad that they die from such causes. About your other statement..... I live in northern michigan and ordered 25 baby chicks. when they arrived they were all living and packed into a space so none of them could move. they were fine and seemed to be comfortable (although they couldent move) but in the north they will pack them in a small box so they stay warm. also the day of their shipment it was about -10 degrees out. they are all still living (i lost one the first day she was the little one) so i dont think the cold is an issue. the hatcheries will have the common sence that if you live in cold climate they will pack them tight. most hatcheries will only allow a minimal order of 15+ chicks.

    just my imput on it [​IMG]
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Great post seminole!
    If you order and it's freezing cold outside and luck is on your side...the chicks don't sit at the airport or in a postal vehicle, then yes it's possible that you can get your chicks and they will do just fine. But what IF? What if there's a delay at the airport or what if postal worker doesn't realize that chicks are fragile and can't handle the cold? Would you worry more about your chicks if it's freezing outside and something like that happens? or would you worry more when it's like 75 degrees outside?
    I want my chicks as bad as everyone else does I'm sure. But just to be on the safe side I'm waiting to have them shipped until April. In my opinion that gives a little more wiggle room to cover the what ifs.
     
  4. mhoward92

    mhoward92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    True, I guess i was lucky in that aspect of it. There is a big hatchery about 1 hr south of were i live so they were only out in the cold for about a total of 5 minutes total. (between the vehicle and the PO) I would deffinately be more concerned if it was cold out. chicks can stand the heat WAY better than the cold.
     
  5. coopist

    coopist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seminolewind, you are right on the money, and Gritsar, you're right too.

    People seem to assume that because the hatcheries are willing to ship chicks in cold weather that the chicks will be fine, but this is often not the case. The hatcheries know that they could lose many of the chicks in shipping, but they don't mind replacing dead shipments because at least that way they have the business (the markup is high enough that they can afford to replace the chicks--and with the ones that do make it factored in, they're still making a profit overall). But it's a simple fact: the earlier in the year it is, the more likely the chicks will chill and die in transit or shortly afterward.
     
  6. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    spring hill, florida
    Coopist, you are so right. Those hatcheries do not have the same level of concern that we do. Chicks do not have any body fat to produce warmth. Even packed tightly together, the temps between the shipper and receiver can not be even near to 90 degrees.
    Anyway, I just meant this post to point out one possibility as to why chicks arrive dead or die shortly after. I would hate for that to happen to anyone.
    Thanks Gritsar, I'm glad we both think alike on this matter
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2008

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