Ordering hatching eggs off the internet?????

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by PeppermintHen, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. PeppermintHen

    PeppermintHen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 5, 2007
    San Antonio, TX
    I am looking to buy hatching eggs off of ebay. I do have an incubator but have other questions. I have NEVER done this before. When you buy the hatching eggs, what stage of incubation are they in? When you put them in the incubator how long till they hatch if they are hatching eggs? What settings do they need to be at? I do have 1 hen and 1 rooster but she just lays eggs and does not sit on them. I want this specific breed I saw on E-bay but have never done the hatching eggs in the mail thing before. Please tell what needs to be done to ensure they hatch. Thanks -- Yvette:)
     
  2. KKluckers

    KKluckers Time Out

    Sep 4, 2007
    I just bought some bantam cochins off ebay. The lady ( Amy?) was great answered alot of my questions . I would refer anyone to her that wants great customer service. This is my first time too, I get one batch of eggs tommarow and hopefully the next batch the day after. Whe you by them they are not incubated you must put them in one. It takes about 21 days for chickens to hatch. Also what kind of incubator do you have? Forced air I think is set at 99.5 and still air 101.5 but you might want to ask someone else though (kinda new at this)[​IMG]
     
  3. Rafter 7 Paint Horses

    Rafter 7 Paint Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    East Texas
    What breed is it you are bidding on?

    When you buy eggs that have to be shipped, you take a chance on them not hatching. Maybe not due to the fault of the breeder, but mailing eggs is very hard on them. Just wanted you to know, so you won't be so upset if things don't go well.
    I've heard people say that if you get 50% of them to hatch you are doing good. Most I have heard about usually range from about 35% to 60% hatch rate.

    I know some have had really good hatches too, I just think that is more common to have lower hatches on shipped eggs.


    Jean
     
  4. jimnjay

    jimnjay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Bryant Alabama
    People who sell eggs for shipping are selling fertile eggs that are usually laid within the a 3-5 day from shipping date. They have been kept in a cool place and usually are turned each day to assure that the yolks don't settle. These eggs have not been incubated at all and while the germ has been fertilized it will not begin to grow until they are placed in a warm spot, ie; under a hen or in an incubator.

    Shipping can be hard on eggs but 70% hatch rates are not uncommon, while most people are prepared to have only a 50% hatch rate. Still in all it is an economical way to get the chicks you want without having to buy 25 from a hatchery. The quality of you chicks will most likely be better as well. Much depends on how they are packaged. You should ask the seller how they handle the packaging. It is customary to have them wrapped in some very soft material including bubble wrap but in a way that air can still get in. Many place them in a carton or small box in a secure manner. That box is then placed inside a second box with lots of filler. Many believe form is not good for eggs. I have not found that to be so, but newspaper or shredded paper works well too.

    You should let the eggs rest after shipping for at least 8 hours and 24 hours is not to long. They should be kept at room temp during this time. The only exception would be if eggs arrived during very hot weather and the eggs were very warm, This could cause the beginning of development. I personally would not cool these eggs down to 70 degrees and then raise the temp again once in the incubator. Rest them at a warmer temp somehow.
     
  5. KKluckers

    KKluckers Time Out

    Sep 4, 2007
    I know it is possible not to have a hatch at all. The breeder did everything she could to protect them(foam and bubble wrap)! But most people have told me 50% is about the norm. Thanks for all the advice I need all the help I can get. I couldnt find these breeds close to home they are bantam cochins (partriage, blue, and silver lace.) I read all the comments she had and people seem to have some hatch. I know it also depends on the PO and the person that is incubating them. So wish me luck, Im going to put them in the bator tonight.[​IMG]
     
  6. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    I am looking to buy hatching eggs off of ebay. I do have an incubator but have other questions. I have NEVER done this before.
    This is a very complex matter and isn’t easily answered in just one moment.

    When you buy the hatching eggs, what stage of incubation are they in?
    They are dormant, viable but not developing.
    When you put them in the incubator how long till they hatch if they are hatching eggs?
    21 days for chickens.
    What settings do they need to be at?
    100 degrees, period. Don’t fuss over half a degree or any of that silliness. Shoot for 100 degrees and don’t worry about swings of 1 degree or so.
    I want this specific breed I saw on E-bay but have never done the hatching eggs in the mail thing before.
    "Mailing eggs is very hard on them. I've heard people say that if you get 50% of them to hatch you are doing good. Most I have heard about usually range from about 35% to 60% hatch rate."

    This is correct. I have hatched more shipped eggs than I care to count and when I get a hatch rate in the 70% range I am pleased. This is dependent on several things.
    1. Distance. The further they go, the more jostling and environmental upset they receive.
    2. Breeding. The person who breeds the birds MUST be good at it and have a high fertility rate. When I find such a breeder, I stick with them.
    3. Packing. There is a certain way they should be packed and it isn’t about cutting corners. The method described herein is adequate.
    4. Time. They need to get to you within a week from lay at the outside. Any more and your hatch rate begins to decline. “You should let the eggs rest after shipping for at least 8 hours and 24 hours is not too long,” …this is correct and adds to the time, as well, so the sooner you get them the better.

    My first eggs were shipped and I still do them. To me, it is one of the best ways to get your birds, especially if you dont want a large order, as was mentioned.
    But nowadays, I know more about the people who breed and produce them and what to look for in a breeders product. That, to me, is the most important thing.

    When in doubt, email Jaynie and ask her. She knows as much as anybody on the matter.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2007
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Jaynie and David answered the questions very well, as always. I have hatched shipped eggs twice, coming from several different states. The first time was an 88% rate, the second, if I remember right, was a 65% rate, probably due to one of the breeds having some very porous eggs.

    If the seller packs extremely well, that sure helps, but the P.O. can do a number on them. One of the people I mailed eggs to myself had the experience of having the P.O. leave the box on her porch in very hot weather, where they sat for several hours, in spite of the huge sticker that told them to HOLD AT P.O., Call customer for pickup. That, IMO, pretty much did them in. It's probably best if you tell the P.O. to hold all your packages for two weeks and put in an official hold order, plus have the seller put a sticker similar to the one of mine I just mentioned. At least then, they aren't left by the side of the road or bounced along a bunch of gravel roads on the way to your house on delivery day.
     

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