Organic eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by monsterkx500, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. monsterkx500

    monsterkx500 Out Of The Brooder

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    What is the different between organic eggs and the fresh country eggs?[​IMG]
     
  2. speckledegg

    speckledegg Out Of The Brooder

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    My guess would be that the organic eggs would have been from hens who are fed an all organic feed. Fresh country eggs are just fresh eggs, which are still yummy, but the hens may or may not be on an organic feed.
     
  3. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Organic is a marketing term that means the hens have been fed organic feed from grain that hasn't been grown with synthetic fertilizers, herbicides, or pesticides. The hens aren't allowed to be kept in cages and must have access to the outdoors, weather permitting.

    That's the very short version... There are many requirements as in the U.S. this marketing program is regulated by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

    Fresh Country Eggs, can mean anything, although you generally get eggs from free-ranging backyard flocks. What they are fed and how they are raised varies from farm to farm.
     
  4. ThinkingChickens

    ThinkingChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Free range eggs are what we look for at farmer's market though some of the dealers do offer organic. The organic feed can get a bit pricey. =0)
     
  5. Mia_

    Mia_ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If we get certified, our eggs would be organic and free range.
     
  6. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:Are you working towards being certified?
     
  7. swmalone

    swmalone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ThinkingChickens
    Today 4:41 pm
    Free range eggs are what we look for at farmer's market though some of the dealers do offer organic. The organic feed can get a bit pricey. =0)

    I have ran across organic eggs at farmer's markets and being that I work in the industry I requested to see a certification since they were pricing theirs higher than the farm fresh eggs. They didn't know what I was talking about, they kept stating that they feed them organic feed, that they are free range, etc. That is all great, but unfortunately organic is a term regulated by the government and there are a lot of requirements, licensing and fees.

    I just wanted to make sure I shared this because unless you are actually certified you should never market your eggs as organic even if you meet the required standards.​
     
  8. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:That's not quite correct. By USDA regulations, if you market less than than $5000 a year in organic products you are allowed to sell your product as "Organic", but not "USDA Certified Organic", but only if you understand and follow the USDA's National Organic Plan requirements. A certification at that level is a good marketing tool, but not necessarily required.

    It's smart to ask questions of those selling as "Organic" without a certification. They may be totally legitimate, but there are some that don't have a clue to what is actually involved. There is more to it than just feeding organic feed.
     
  9. swmalone

    swmalone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    mac in abilene
    Today 7:53 pm
    swmalone wrote:

    I just wanted to make sure I shared this because unless you are actually certified you should never market your eggs as organic even if you meet the required standards.
    That's not quite correct. By USDA regulations, if you market less than than $5000 a year in organic products you are allowed to sell your product as "Organic", but not "USDA Certified Organic", but only if you understand and follow the USDA's National Organic Plan requirements. A certification at that level is a good marketing tool, but not necessarily required.

    It's smart to ask questions of those selling as "Organic" without a certification. They may be totally legitimate, but there are some that don't have a clue to what is actually involved. There is more to it than just feeding organic feed.

    The person at our farmer's market actually printed up the USDA Organic Logo and had it at their table. I wasn't aware that there was a limit of $5000, personally I would just avoid the whole organic thing unless you want to get the USDA certification. Part of this is image and people's perceptions. You can market farm fresh, cage free, suburban eggs, or whatever and not have all the issues associated with "Organic".​
     
  10. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:That's a large part of it.

    You can market farm fresh, cage free, suburban eggs, or whatever and not have all the issues associated with "Organic".

    Yet there are some producers that produce organically not necessarily just for the premium, but because that is their personal preference. Some folks wouldn't dream of feeding conventional feed because of the big-ag connections, GMO crops, unsustainability, etc. These folks need to charge a premium to cover their costs and still make a profit and should be able market their products as "Organic" if they follow the national standards. For the very small-scale producer certification costs can be a burdensome proportion of their gross profit.​
     

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