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Orp with weird colored eyes

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by OkieB, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. OkieB

    OkieB Songster

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    I have a year old Buff Orp. She has been sick about 2 weeks now. She has rapid breathing, won't eat but is drinking antibiotic fluids from the vet. No congestion, no loss of balance. But today I noticed that her eyes look strange. As in her pupils are bluish, glassy tinted. Could she be going blind? I don't know what to do as I don't want to spend tons on one chicken, but I don't want her to suffer. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member 7 Years

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    Can you post any pictures of her eyes? There are several eye disorders in chickens from infection, cataracts, injuries, viruses including Mareks and avian encephalomyelitis (AE,) and vitamin A or E deficiency. Chemical burns from ammonia odors in coops can also cause blindness.
     
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  3. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Free Ranging 5 Years

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    :pop
     
  4. OkieB

    OkieB Songster

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    Sorry I have been busy... I will post eye pictures momentarily.
     
  5. OkieB

    OkieB Songster

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    Here are pics of both eyes. Her right eye is the one she can't see out of.
    20180620_132033.jpg 20180620_132037.jpg 20180620_132039.jpg 20180620_132048.jpg 20180620_132047.jpg
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member 7 Years

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    Closeup, they do look fuzzy around the edge of the iris. AE infection early in life, as well as Mareks disease cause the grey eye. I would not be qualified to know one disease (cataracts, vitamin deficiency, Mareks) from another.
     
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  7. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    The combination of breathing problems and eye colour change would suggest Marek's to me. Unfortunately there is no recognised treatment for that although vitamin supplementation to support the immune system can help them fight it.
     
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  8. OkieB

    OkieB Songster

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    Right on. Let me ask this... is Marek's always deadly? Also,will every bird exposed contract it?
     
  9. OkieB

    OkieB Songster

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    And once they get it can they have it again?
     
  10. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    Once they get it they have it for life but it has dormant phases, just like cold sores in humans (both are Herpes viruses) and they only actively shed the virus whilst symptomatic. Not all birds will get it just like not all people get cold sores, but you cannot tell which have it and which don't until they suffer an outbreak, so you have to assume all have been infected. Symptoms can vary enormously and resemble other illnesses or suppress the immune system and leave them open to secondary infections like coccidiosis or respiratory infections. Strains vary from mild to severe.

    I have had birds recover from an initial outbreak and then be completely normal for over a year before their second attack, others die suddenly of their first outbreak and some take weeks or even months of supportive care to recover or die. They will always be prone to subsequent outbreaks and these are usually triggered by stress like a change of environment, new flock additions, hormone surge at adolescence or decline at moult, harassment by adolescent cockerels or confinement due to inclement weather, to name but a few.
    If you have one of the hotter strains you may lose quite a lot of young birds to it. I have a milder strain in my flock and have had quite a few recover from outbreaks with supportive care. That said, I haven't had one with respiratory issues recover. Marek's has various phases and the end phase is the development of visceral tumours. The lungs are one of the commonest places for them to develop, so if she doesn't respond to antibiotics, it might suggest that a tumour is causing her respiratory distress or it could be a fungal infection like aspergillosis or possibly canker due to a compromised immune system. I have read that an Oxine vapouriser can be beneficial if antibiotics don't work.
     
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