OS_Dad Island Flock

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by OSDad, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. OSDad

    OSDad Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 28, 2016
    Nova Scotia, CANADA
    Our current status is 2 cockerels and 10 hens. we harvested the other 8 cockerels and they currently reside in the freezer.

    The hens are a mix of 1 Easter egger, 2 barred rocks 2 Chanteclers nd 5 production reds, listed oldest to youngest. All are about 16-23 weeks old.

    Still no eggs, We look every day in anticipation.

    The weather is dropping to 0 degrees Celsius over night going to 10-15 degrees during the day.

    They free range the yard for at least a few hours at the end of the day.

    I have moved their feeders inside and am in the works of working on hopefully an ice free waterer.

    I guess Im looking for the "No worries, you'll get that fist egg any day"speech! LOL

    Thanks for listening
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    St. Louis, MO
    No worries - sorry, I couldn't resist.

    Temperature has very little to do with egg laying. Things like nutrition, breed, housing and stress aside, onset of lay is strictly a function of day length and whether it is getting shorter or longer.
    Birds approaching POL this time of year will take much longer to commence.

    Here's an article I posted about how photoperiod affects egg laying and reproduction in general.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...chooks-and-many-many-more/11180#post_17735882

    I did a survey of egg production of 4 flocks from December through March in a spreadsheet by flock with daily temps and humidity. There was no correlation between temperature and production. It may have been a small sample size but if anything, the production was better during colder spells.
     
  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    An advantage of delayed onset of lay is that their bodies are more developed and have fewer problems.
    Another is that their first eggs are larger. I have three 28 week old pullets that started laying last week.
    Normally when this breed starts to lay at about 22 weeks, their eggs are around 45-50 grams.
    I got 3 eggs today that were 57, 59 and 70 grams. The 70 gram egg is that bird's third and her first two were about 60 or so.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
  4. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    agree
     
  5. OSDad

    OSDad Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 28, 2016
    Nova Scotia, CANADA
    [​IMG]
    This is Peep, he would be about 20 weeks old now. He's going to have some beautiful colouring.
     
  6. OSDad

    OSDad Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 28, 2016
    Nova Scotia, CANADA
    [​IMG]
    This is Buddy, he's the main man. He would be right around 24 weeks old.
     
  7. OSDad

    OSDad Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 28, 2016
    Nova Scotia, CANADA
    [​IMG]
    This is Joy, she's our only Easter egger pullet. She would be right around 24 weeks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2016

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