Ostrich Eggs, Chicks, & Juvies

Discussion in 'Other Poultry - Birds & Hatching Eggs' started by 29PalmsRanch, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. 29PalmsRanch

    29PalmsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2013
    It's Ostrich season again! Our males are booming, our hens are fluttering, and eggs are in the incubators!

    We specialize in blue-black crosses. The end result is roosters which average 6.5 - 7 feet, hens which lay 70+ eggs per season, and dispositions that can be considered mild when compared to reds. We consider them to be dual use ostriches and use them for both meat and egg production. Meat yields average 70 pounds per bird at an average wholesale price of 20.00 per pound. Edible Eggs, Fertile Hatching Eggs, Chicks, and Juvi's (6 - 9 months) are available now.

    Send us a message or call us between 7am and 8pm - any day for more information.

    29 Palms Ranch
    Robertsdale, Alabama
    (251) 964-2922

    Please note! We are NOT affiliated with any other farms or ranches. The images in this ad were taken on our farm. These are our eggs, chicks, and a couple of our adult breeders. And yes, that is a 'brand new' Hatchrite incubator. It's given us the best hatch rate so far. We were lucky enough to find a brand new unit that was almost 18 years old collecting dust in a warehouse, still in its shipping crate! Very rare, but a really neat unit :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2014
  2. plunk72

    plunk72 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 11, 2011
  3. 29PalmsRanch

    29PalmsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry, didn't see your post. We are located in Southern Alabama.
     
  4. JuliaSh

    JuliaSh Out Of The Brooder

    29PalmsRanch, Hello what is the prices for newborn and 3 months old chicks if you have them? And will you have them somewhere around end of April or beginning of May?
     
  5. benjhm11

    benjhm11 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2014
    Macon, Ga
    How much do you sell the eggs for?
     
  6. 29PalmsRanch

    29PalmsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We sell pure Blue/Black crosses. We have ZERO reds in our bloodlines. The reason this is important is two fold:

    1) Egg production is approximately 70 - 80 per year as opposed to the 30 (if you are lucky) that you will get from Red lines.
    2) You should count on an average of 70 pounds per bird for meat production. This is a bit on the low side, but it's safer when estimating or projecting yield vs. cost.

    Our newborn chicks (2 - 4 weeks) are competitively priced with the rest of the market.
    We will have newborns in less than 40 days. Our first two batches are expected to hatch in 2 weeks to confirm viability. The third batch is what will be made available for sale first. This batch was set last Sunday.

    We basically add 100.00 per chick for each month of life. We will mentor you if you are not experienced with these magnificent animals and offer a buy back of 700.00 on any bird purchased from us at 10 months or older if you find that ostrich isn't for you.

    If you need further information please do not hesitate to contact me directly:

    29 Palms Ranch
    Robertsdale, AL
    (251) 964-2922
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2014
  7. 29PalmsRanch

    29PalmsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our fertile hatching eggs are only 100.00 each plus actual cost shipping. By the way, we include the shipping receipt with the shipment of eggs so that you can see what we paid.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2014
  8. pidgey104

    pidgey104 Cochins R Us

    Nov 10, 2007
    Panama City ,Florida
    We raise emus. How tall of fence do you have to have for ostriches? Do they escape often?
    What are their temperaments? are they a mean bird? do you get hurt by them often? We never have problems with our emus. we keep them in 5 foot horse wire and never had any escape.
     
  9. 29PalmsRanch

    29PalmsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Pidgey! You're not too far from us. We'd be more than happy to show you around sometime. Fencing for ostriches is more to personal preference than anything as long as common sense is used. We've seen all kinds of things from wood rails with tin panels, to standard 4' field fence with t posts, to t post/wire/4x4 field fence with a top wire strand double strand barbless. And they all work. If you are going to run 4' or 5' fence, I'd still do a top wire. I have seen two males go at it through 4' wire and one literally walk over the top of the fence. Top wires went up, breeder pens went up and that problem disappeared immediately. More on breeder runs in a moment.

    What I prefer is what you see in my pics. That's made of 4 x 4 x 10's sunk 3.5 feet in the dirt with 40 pounds of concrete on the end of each. I'm 6' flat footed, 6' 2" in boots lol. My posts are generally just taller than me in boots. The rails are spaced 5.75 inches apart (width of the wood), are 5 rails high, and are 2 x 6 x 16 treated. The fence is screwed together, not nailed. You get less maintenance and greater flexibility out of your wood if you screw it together. At the top and half way to the top rail we run a double line of double strand barbless wire. The problem is cost. That's a very expensive fence.

    Now, we did all of our inner perimeter fence this way. Our house is surrounded by our pastures. We also have very huge English Mastiffs and we wanted to be sure we built something that kept the ostriches and dogs apart. That did the trick.

    Now, our breeder runs are a completely different story. We still concrete our posts which a lot of people don't bother with and to tell you the truth, it really isn't necessary. I prefer to have zero fence maintenance. So I tend to overbuild everything. We just got the supplies in for our new breeder runs this morning. We went with 5' class three 16' "hog panels", 10' 4x4 posts, and our standard double top wire configuration. You want the fence to be able to give a little if they run into it. It is also important to face the fence to the inside towards the birds whatever you use. They can get feet jammed into corners between fence and wire so you want to make sure that can't happen or you'll lose birds. We build our runs 150' x 50' for TRIOS, not quads. If you go with quads, you want to run larger. Some prefer 200' x 100'. Others are 150' x 100'. The key is grazable land and the ability for the birds to stretch their legs if they want. Also important is to run a piece of heavy field fence in a gentle half circle on your four inner corners. You'll have hens that take off on occasion from a rooster. If you round out your corners, it will turn the bird and they will continue to run up the side of the run. If they can run into the actual corner they'll get stuck and you never know what is going to happen from that point. It's not like you are going to jump in the middle of two kicking birds. Whether they run into it or fight, without rounded inner corners, you are subjecting yourself to the lose of a very very expensive animal. We are going to put 7' of space between these runs so that we can easily get a bobcat or tractor between them. You want the space so that the males do kick at each other through the fence. And when they are in season... it's not a question of if they are going to do it but how hard they are going to go at it.

    The other thing we do that others also do is not only seed high protein grasses like rye in the winter and alfalfa mixes in the spring, but we also toss in grains like wheat, barley, and flax in the spring. That planting happens this coming weekend. Yee haw. This way, feed time is actually supplemental feed time, not primary feed time. They get the majority of what they need right out of the pastures instead of the feed bag. We still drop calcium for the hens to take at will. Our birds are incredibly healthy and it doesn't cost a fortune to keep a flock if you are smart about pasture set up and maintenance.

    Hope this helps :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2014
  10. bounceraatnol

    bounceraatnol New Egg

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    Feb 28, 2014
    is the $100 for the eggs r babies... what is the shipping rate.. I live in Louisiana... will u contact me at 337 401 8116 thank u
     

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