OT... this is just so cool... UPDATE Pedigree added

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Arklady, Jun 17, 2007.

  1. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 30, 2007
    Kansas
    I am trading a cockatiel w/cage for a boer goat for my female goat I just bought! AND the lady is selling me a horse for 80$!!!!!!

    Isn't that the bomb!!!

    Arklady
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2007
  2. Poison Ivy

    Poison Ivy Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 2, 2007
    Naples, Florida
    That's great love a good deal when it pops up. when I was looking for my daughter a horse. We found a lady selling two but I only wanted the mare. She kept asking me if I wanted the TB named Foster. I kept saying no I only need 1 she called me later in the afternoon and ask if we would board Foster for her. They were moving to Tampa I said sure for $150 & she buys the food. So a hour later she calls and said her husband told her to just give me the horse! So I got a buy one get one free deal. I keep him for 3 months then sold him for $600. So the deal worked out great!
     
  3. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. Frizzledhen

    Frizzledhen Spear Gunnin' Coons

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    Arklady,
    If you feel you got a good deal, great!
    In my book, buying a weanling ends up costing more than buying a broke, gelded, ridable 3 year old. He is cute but will cost big bucks by the time he is 3 and you will spend 2 plus years getting him ready to ride. Been there done that. I raised many colts and loved it but economically, you would come out ahead buying an older horse that is already broke. Of course if it is the journey that has you excited, go for it. $80 isn't bad to start that long journey. I miss raising horses (not the showing though) maybe I am just old and jealous. [​IMG]

    Gayle
    Chi lady in Michigan [​IMG]
     
  5. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ya know. I did do my homework... I have talked over and over with solid reliable horse people who have been in the business for over 20 years experience and they all said the same thing. For a first horse buy a weanling because they don't know that you don't know what your doing and we can grow together. But I 'do' know.

    Am I excited? Kind of... but not so much as I am not aware of the possible costs of horse care. Plus a lot of issues are... preventable. I am sure there will be issues... but actually I don't know why you would say that if you don't know my situation. I feel you are guessing...

    If I feel at anytime it is beyond me then I shall correct the situation.

    But at this time. Its within our plan.

    Now don't get me wrong I am not angry. But I do feel sometimes people on this list advise before they listen. How did you get started with your first horse? I would be interested in hearing about it Gayle.

    Arklady
     
  6. Frizzledhen

    Frizzledhen Spear Gunnin' Coons

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    Arklady,
    ???? I am glad you are not angry. I had no intent of upsetting you. Many people do not know the expense of raising a foal to ridable age. Horses of any age are expensive to keep. I just took it that you thought $80 was a good deal for a weanling. In "my book" it is not and I just tried to point that out. I also would never advise a beginner with no knowledge of care and training to buy an unbroke colt. Someone will pay, be it the buyer or the colt. They pack a great deal of power in their young body. Even very experienced horse trainers get hurt. I would not want anyone to get hurt by a horse because of lack of knowledge. It happens to even those who have years of knowledge.

    My first horse.......went to work at 15, saved my money, 2 years later bought my first horse. Worked ever since to pay for her and the others that came after her. She was a 2 yr old mare, untrained but gentle. I had no knowledge of training or caring for a hores. All I had was a love as big as the sky for horses. We learned together. As I look back at the beginning, 40 years ago, I can see ALL the mistakes I made. I never got hurt (with this horse) but I hurt my beloved horse only due to ignorance. I do not even pretend to know it all, but I know enough to advise against buying a weanling if one is lacking in care and training knowledge. It takes more than love to turn a colt into a great horse.
    If an 8# rooster can intimidate and injure a person, just think what a 1000# untrained horse could do.
    I wish you the best with your colt, really I do. They are wonderful animals and can bring so much joy to those who love them.

    Gayle
    Chi lady in Michigan
     
  7. Arklady

    Arklady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Actually have you ever dealt with a 2-300 lb goat? Or a sheep?? Them babies can be nasty if they want to. Its all in the handling. And you should try a llama... now those are intresting especially when they want to spit and you see it comeing lol... They get so mad when they miss.

    I have a 230lb male Son called Phillip and boy can he be a rock when dealing with a critter. But honestly I don't think we will have too much trouble. Its all in what you let them get away with. And I don't. I don't tolerate disobedience from any of my animals its just tha goats are more food animals so I won't give them the time some folks do. But horses are different and if you deal with them right they can be your best friend.

    Arklady
     
  8. CarriBrown

    CarriBrown Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    Arklady-
    You have a long road ahead of you but it will be worth it if you take your time with your little guy. I've owned horses my whole life and I've seen it go both ways- A person who knows squat ends up being a great horse owner because they take the time and learn, talk, listen to advise... and I've also seen the "experienced" horseperson screw up a foal because they think they know it all.
    He's a good looking little boy and I'm sure he'll bring you tons of joy and teach you a lot. There are a handful of horse people on here. Just let us know if you have any questions! [​IMG]
    My word of advice-take it or leave it-: I've broke horses and I've sent them out. Sending them out for 60 days is the way to go, IMO. I bought a 2 year old filly and got her all the way up to the point of riding. I taught her to drive, tie, lounge, trailer, clip, saddle, take a bit, etc. etc. then sent her out for 60 days and got back a horse I could ride. Granted, I've done a couple years of work on her since, but I'd highly recommend doing it that way. If you find a good trainer, they will let you watch their sessions and you can really learn a lot. Star is now five years and a great little horse with an excellent foundation.
     
  9. SunChick

    SunChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 23, 2007
    Bel Air, Maryland
    Lots of good advice! The only reason I could see buying a weanling....and this is because I have gone through this, is to have a shot at a dream horse you could not possibly afford at a rideable age and are far and very few in between. I wouldn't recommend it if you don't have any experience. My neighbors have a very unruly young palomino paint that their 13yr old is working and has no business working. I see lots of problems for them in the future just on what I witness on a daily basis. My horse's breed (Andalusian) just reached 10,000 registered here in the US, course that doesn't take in account how many have passed on etc. My filly had really good basics as a weanling because I worked with an excellent breeder who has earned high honors in the Andy community. Even the company that delivered her to me said that this breeder's horses were absolute gems to handle. That still didn't stop her from trying to alpha me and she got older and test me at learning new lessons or from spooking one day and literally running me over. Some times you don't see it coming. I have worked with young horses before and it is a lot of patience and work! She is now 2 and will possibly go under saddle this fall. She is like an 900lb lab in a horse's body. She is very affectionate and sweet not to mention incredibly smart. She has to be one of the easiest horses I have worked with and the smartest--she remembers very quickly what she is taught and I have to be very careful what I teach her or how I influence her. I am considering sending her out for under saddle training myself just to not go through the hassle between finding time for my job and working her. You can't really compare goats, lhamas, cows etc to horses in the way of handling. Its like apples and oranges. Hopefully you'll have fun and stay safe! Your new acquisition is very cute.
     
  10. Rafter 7 Paint Horses

    Rafter 7 Paint Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    East Texas
    Arklady
    Congrats on the new baby!!!

    Will he be halter broke when you get him? If at all possible, have them do this before you pick him up. It will make your life a lot easier since I gather from the posts that this will be your first horse.

    If this is your first experience with horses, just remember "what is cute when he is little won't be cute when he is over 1000 lbs." Use common sense and disipline.
    Ya know...just like kids!!!!

    If more people would do that, kids and animals wouldn't be such outlaws. JMHO

    Anyway, he looks very nice, and I'm sure you will enjoy him.

    If you need some help or just have some questions, just holler real loud, we'll all give you our 2 cents worth!!

    Jean
     

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