Our Chicken was attacked by our dog!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Allisha, May 22, 2016.

  1. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, we were priding ourselves in a small way that none of our chickens have died from anything. Well, one of our chickens(of course our favorite one), got out of the run. Our dog, unfortunately, broke his chain and attacked her. I heard a squabbling, and I ran out and found her lying on her stomach, and our Siberian Husky three feet away, just staring at her. My dad ran out and got him, and hen our chicken, who we call Crooked Beak, ran as fast as her little limp could carry her, to me. I reached for her, and I see multiple puncture wounds. When her feathers exploded out of her body, I think he stopped. Or it was an instinctual thing, and after he did it, he stopped. Nonetheless, his first bite was hard. The puncture wounds look pretty deep, not too deep. Not deep enough for a fatal bite.

    However, now I face a problem. She may go into shock, and those wounds need to be tended to, tomorrow. She cannot stand, and she is in pain. We put her in a small crate with some food, water, and grass. I also covered her up, so she is in a dim area, and as quite as it can be. Is there anything else I can do for her first night? I just need her to get past the shock first. She started panting and heaving at first, but it has been about half an hour, and her breathing seems normal now. Does agony contribute to shock? And how can I help her pain?

    And then, for tomorrow, what should I get for her wounds? Neosporin, hydrogen peroxide the first few flushes, and then what else?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Sorry about your chicken. Do you have any SaveAChick or other brand of electolytes and vitamins that you can put in her water. Hold some up to her beak to drink. Fluids are more important that food at first. Betadine or chlorhexidene (Hibiclens) are good to use to clean the wounds. Vetericyn is also good. If there is a puncture wound, peroxide can be used once to help flush out the wound, but it can keep the wound from healing with repeated use. Plain antibiotic ointment such as Bacitracin or Neosporin are good to use after the wound is clean. I have had hens with no wounds die, while another who was badly injured make a full recovery. The first hours may tell if she will be alright. It sounds like you are doing the right things to keep her quiet. If she is alert she may want some fluids to drink. After she drinks enough, then offer some food, such as chopped egg, tuna, or feed moistened with water. Keep us posted on what is happening.
     
  3. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    X 2 on all counts -- you have done well so far and seem to have very good instincts for what you need to do. Chickens are very resilient animals and can bounce back from seemingly unsurvivable incidents. Continue to provide good supportive care, monitor for infection and let her body do the work.
     
  4. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She is still alive, so I believe she has gone past the shock stage? The wounds themselves are not fatal, so I believe as long as they do not become infected, they will be fine?
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    That is about right. Most wounds need some time to heal, especially if they are lacerations or puncture wounds. Bruising can look green, so don't panic if you see green skin. The feathers will normally grow back in a few weeks. Is she drinking or eating for you? Is she alert?
     
  6. Allisha

    Allisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She has gained her appetite for thirst, and has pecked and ate some grass, however, she will not eat her grain.

    Tomorrow we will go into town and find something that is not as abrasive as hydrogen peroxide.Well, I read on various threads to use Blu Kote on chicken wounds, and I put some on her, and then I read that it is not meant to be put on puncture wounds!!!!! It is too late this time around, but should I continue putting it on her? Already, the wound seems to be "weeping", but it may not be. They ARE puncture wounds, however, they are not deep. She cannot really walk yet, but it hasn't even been 48 hours since the attack.
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Peroxide is fine for puncture wounds, used once or twice. Then use plain antibiotic ointment such as plain neosporin or bacitracin twice a day. Betadine is good to keep around for wound care. Give her some chopped egg, canned tuna, liver, and add water to her feed. Liquids are more important at first, then give food.
     
  8. Tex63

    Tex63 Out Of The Brooder

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    Try to stay away from hydrogen peroxide. Peroxide actually kills living tissue. Betadine or chlorihexadine are much better choices to flush and disinfect. Any antibiotic ointment should work to help prevent infection. sounds as if you are doing the right things. It's a wait and see situation now.
     
  9. mikeldb

    mikeldb Out Of The Brooder

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    last one I had that happened to got ripped open from its head to its tail, I sewed it up with a needle and thread, gave it a tylan and b12 shoot and gave antibiotics in its water healed up in about 2-3 weeks but had she'll shock after that but he lived fine and still flew and everything
     
  10. mikeldb

    mikeldb Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh and don't use batadine, use bactine it's safe and non toxic you can get it at walmart. It is not only a disinfectant but helps relieve pain too
     

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