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our girls have stopped laying!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by buckeyehens, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. buckeyehens

    buckeyehens New Egg

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    Jun 30, 2012
    We have a group of 10 mixed breed girls that seem to have gone on strike. The oldest are about 2 1/2 years old, and until about 4 to 6 weeks ago we would grt 5-7 eggs daily. A dog attacked them, didn't kill any, but sure shook them up. Since then 1 maybe 2 is as good as it gets. They are free range in a fenced area about 25 x 80 ft. Any ideas? We had to BUY eggs today... I could hardly open my wallet!
     
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Feb 18, 2011
    Ohio
    If they are not hiding eggs somewhere, unfortunately for your wallet, stress or anything that upsets chickens, like a dog attack, can make them stop laying for a period of time. This time of year, especially with two year old hens, they may also be molting, and that will stop them laying also...do they look to be? Do you have them under lights, shortening daylight hours will slow down laying...
     
  3. buckeyehens

    buckeyehens New Egg

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    Jun 30, 2012
    Thanks for the note back... one does seem to be molting. That hadn't happened before so we looked it up here on BYC and found pictures. Weve had them stop laying before, but only for a few dsys... this has been weeks. Is there something we can do to get them back in rhythm? They dont seem to be hiding them... at least we can't find them.
     
  4. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Feb 18, 2011
    Ohio
    If they are doing a full molt it usually takes them about three months to finish, if they are doing partials they may get done faster. Some people like to up their protein levels since they need a lot to grow feathers and it may hasten the process. The older girls do need 14-16 hours of light a day to lay, so depending where you are, you may want to put light in the coop if you haven't started yet. The Poultry Site's page on molting. http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/217/moulting-a-natural-process
     

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