1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Over-enthusiastic Rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chanamarie, Nov 28, 2016.

  1. chanamarie

    chanamarie Out Of The Brooder

    96
    6
    41
    Mar 16, 2016
    I added a few more silkies to my flock a few weeks ago, including a rooster (well, 2, but only one is a problem). He's larger than the other ones (inc the other rooster) and solidly built.

    Today I caught him grabbing and pulling around my younger silkie (hatched out end of July) trying to get on top of her. He literally dragged her around as she tried to escape. I was not impressed.

    So (I've had chickens less than a year, so not so experienced)...normal behavior that won't really hurt her or time to rehome this guy?
     
  2. PeepersMama

    PeepersMama Overrun With Chickens

    Don't rehome him, freeze him. Roo's that enthusiastic shouldn't be kept in my opinion. There's the chance that someone will breed him, and then his sons will be breeding crazy, and from that comes all the more trouble for the hens [​IMG]
    OR you could just get a bunch of standard sized hens like Black sex-links or barred rocks. They are typically more dominant breeds and won't tolerate a chicken half their size trying to boss them around. AND they'll be big enough to deal with him.
     
  3. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,182
    255
    211
    Jul 18, 2013
    Pennsylvania
    Unexperienced boys are full of hormones and really don't know what they are doing. And of course a more dominant hen won't put up with them and will put them in their place, so they start with the smaller and lower ranking pullets. The boys also mature faster than the girls.
    Depending on your number of pullets you may need only one roo. If you think this one has potential you can pen him away from the younger birds until he matures or if you have older experienced hens you can put him with them.
    Good luck, a young inexperienced roo with poor technique can be hard on the young girls which is why most people get rid of their extra boys or form bachelor pads with them.
     
  4. chanamarie

    chanamarie Out Of The Brooder

    96
    6
    41
    Mar 16, 2016
    Thanks, guys. He is young, so it might just be that he needs to mature a bit. But I don't want him killing a pullet whilst he's maturing!

    I have a friend who has standard chickens who might want him as he is a handsome guy and is friendly, just too rough. So disappointing as he 'looks the part'!
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

    5,427
    1,468
    351
    Mar 19, 2011
    NW Oregon
    Wise decision though.

    It is painful when they look so good but their personalities are not what you want.

    You don't want to breed forward aggressiveness...and I've found that my nice roo's are nice from day one and handle the teen hormones as gentlemen....those that don't, go to freezer camp or sold to people who have room and knowledge to deal with them.

    And a bit of thought for you...you've got Silkies which are excellent broodies. I find my broody hens put their boys in their place and teach them to behave in the flock. If they can't...well back to freezer camp.

    LofMc
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by