Over the fence

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by PatS, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. PatS

    PatS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2009
    Northern Califonia
    I usually let the turkeys and chickens out of the run to free range about 6 and I head back to bed for another hour. Well, at 7 there is one of those strange turkey noises that let you know something is wrong. DH goes out and calls back that one of the turkeys is on top of the hoop house (veggie garden). The hoop house is right next to the property line, as are the garage and the chicken house. He goes to coax down our little friend, when he hears one of the females calling from the other side of the 7' wire deer fence. Yup, she's in the neighbor's yard.

    He went over to their front yard and coaxed her through a hole in the fence, so disaster (and dog!) averted.

    They have showed no interest in leaving our property, but it is easy to jump off a building and end up on the wrong side of a fence. I'm not so sure they would realize they CAN jump over the fence back to our yard. We're in the country and have wire fencing everywhere, and I'm not sure they even see it. They are 2-1/2 month old BRs and are just starting to look up at the world above us. For the next few weeks I can see that maybe I need to get up and stay up once they are let out because they stick real close to us when we are moving around the house or yard.

    Do turkeys figure out fencing?
     
  2. Sir Birdaholic

    Sir Birdaholic Night Knight

    Mine go over every once in a while, but realize that the flock is on the other side, so instantly want back in.
     
  3. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    PatS wrote: Do turkeys figure out fencing?

    If not stressed, and on the ground, yes (ours could enter the chicken run - shares common fence with turkey run), but they walk around to their gate and into their run. Poults on the wing? No. Like birdaholic said, they will stick to searching for a way back to get in with their buddies and won't wander off.

    Our RP hen was the only one of our turks that would fly out and fly back into the turkey run (never did fly into the adjacent chicken run). The Slate hen would fly out with the RP, but the RP would fly back into the closed run while the Slate circled the outside of the fencing.

    The little guys are most likely to lift-off 30min. before/after sundown. Is there some way to put up flight/deer netting above run? If they can be contained where you want them the limited choices for roosting offered will become the preferred locations after a month or so. Covering run will keep any from meeting the dog and will allow you to get some sleep.​
     
  4. PatS

    PatS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2009
    Northern Califonia
    You're both correct. It was apparent she wanted back to where her friends were, and was going to stick close by.

    The run itself is covered, but that is what I open up at 6 AM. They have the freedom of the yard once let out of the run/coop area.

    They are getting used to going into the run to roost at night, but still require "an escort." They prefer to hang out on the railings next to our living room or the bedroom. But it has only been a week or so since we have been herding them to the run -- before that it was a brooder pen they slept in. Each night it is easier to get them to go to bed.

    That is interesting, about them wanting to fly right around sundown (and maybe I should add sunup to the list, after today!), that is exactly when they have been flying onto the different buildings. I didn't connect that. Thanks!
     
  5. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    PatS wrote: That is interesting, about them wanting to fly right around sundown (and maybe I should add sunup to the list, after today!), that is exactly when they have been flying onto the different buildings. I didn't connect that. Thanks!

    Yikes! I was thinking 6PM, not 6AM, (evening/night default, here). Yes, they are pretty full of themselves in the AM and will goad one another into ever more complicated stunts (derring-do!). Our (then) jennies liked to park themselves up on the chimney and wait until we were a good distance from the house before `bombing' down on us, yelping and running around us in circles (pleased with themselves, I guess). They are also way too curious and, more than once, lined up single file behind a Box Turtle, wandering out into the woods, gawking about, pweeting and trilling to one another as if discussing the nature of the hard shelled beast (eat it? Be scared of it?), but all five trailing along as if hypnotized.

    We simply didn't range ours unless one of us was here. Just too many preds. Our Slate's current poult is taking lessons from her mama instead of us humans and that is a relief (has already learned to intimidate and chase off our outdoor cat).

    Once they hit 8 months, or so, they settle down (somewhat [​IMG] ), the jakes more so than the jennies; jakes spar but, unlike the jennies, don't punch into the sky as often just for the sheer enjoyment of it.

    Count on them taking to the wing at sundown (first the plaintive `pweeting', then the eyeballing of the `sky' (roosting potentials), then lift-off). A sixteen ft. length of 1"x2" comes in handy to slide them off branches/low roofs.

    If they are provided with some places to jump/fly up on in the yard, during the day, they won't (as often) head for more unacceptable locations further away.​
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2010
  6. PatS

    PatS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2009
    Northern Califonia
    If they are provided with some places to jump/fly up on in the yard, during the day, they won't (as often) head for more unacceptable locations further away.

    Right now they like the railing around the landings outside our doors, the compost bins, and of course the car and truck. But it is probably time to make some tall roosts outside against things in the middle of the property.

    Thanks for the insights!​
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2010

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