Oviduct Impaction Remedy??!?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Isidore777, Mar 26, 2018.

  1. Isidore777

    Isidore777 In the Brooder

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    May 4, 2017
    I took my chicken (almost 3 year old, Barred Rock) to the vet, and she most likely has Salpingitis/Oviduct impaction (chronic, Bacterial infection) -- her abdomen and oviduct are full of firm material. The vet said that antibiotics are unlikely to work, and surgery is the only other medical option. Our chickens did stay in the coop a lot this winter, because of the snow, the cold, and wind and their pen did get pretty muddy too with the snow melting (which could also be a cause of her condition).
    This morning, there was watery poop (I lifted her off the perch) - she went right outside (did not eat first) and seemed to just be standing (moving a little) and pecking the ground a little (not that active). I just let her out to free range, and she seems to be a bit more spunky/active eating grass and tried to escape me when I went to grab her to take pictures.
    Are there any home remedies that I can use to help heal it? Are there certain essential oils that I can use on her? I know it could be caused from a vitamin D or calcium deficiency, are there any supplements that are recommended? Should I separate her from the other 10 chickens?
    Thanks in advance!
     

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    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Unfortunately there is not a whole lot that you can do, since these are very common reasons for chickens over 2 years to die. Antibiotics will not cure it, but some have some improvement for a short time treating with a broad spectrum antibiotic that treats E.coli. I would make her comfortable, offer foods she will eat, and when she appears to be suffering, put her down.
     
  3. Hen Pen Jem

    Hen Pen Jem Crowing

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    Greetings Isidore777,

    Your vet is right, surgery is the only real chance she has. But is it a realistic option for you, and the hen? I went through this with my Black Star hen. I opted not to do surgery, antibiotics early on, helped. Surgery on birds is very risky. The after care is also very important to their survival. So if you work outside the home, you won't be able to administer meds when needed. This is a very involved solution for the hen. As for home remedies...yes, there are some things you can do, depending on the severity of the condition.

    My hen had infection of the oviduct, which caused ascite buildup, which caused her belly to swell, and eventually a hernia and congested heart. I was able to give my hen another six months of happy chicken life, with a HUGE amount of care. This route, too, is very involved as a treatment. Daily, herbs are administered orally. Then, there are weekly Epsom Salt soaks, and, creams rubbed on the belly for the swelling, daily. Accommodations are added to the coop and even yard, as, the hen will have difficult days getting around, due to the swelling. My hen was a pet, I am retired, so I had all the time needed to care for her.

    In the end, my girl could no longer tolerate the daily meds. She became frustrated, very stressed, which could have killed her, so I had to stop the meds. Without the herbal meds, the infection reoccurred. In just a month the oviduct became impacted with coagulated puss and gunk. Her belly swelled so huge she could no longer walk, lost interest in food and water. I made the decision to euthanize her, last month. It broke my heart to do it, but it was in her best interest. My vet did the euthanizing, and I wrapped her in a towel, stroked and talked to her lovingly as she passed. She is buried here on my property, as one of my beloved pets.

    The death process from this condition, is terrible. Some hens die when the oviduct ruptures from the pressure of the impacted material. First, they stop eating, drinking, poop diarrhea, then water, as they waste away, and finally die in misery. Others die when they rupture the swollen belly jumping off a perch, or on some rock or stick in the pen or yard. This is the worst, as the intestines pour out of the wound, while the hen walks around! These are results reported here on BYC.

    This is not a condition that can be remedied with supplements or essential oils. Especially, once the oviduct is being filled with solid material. This condition is commonly caused by an upper respiratory infection, that migrates to the reproductive system at some point.

    And, as Eggcessive said, there is not a whole lot you can do. But, before going with the surgery, make sure you are informed on future care of the chicken. Will she need an implant to alter hormones, how often, etc.

    I'm so sorry that your hen is ill with this. I hope that my thoughts on the issue will be helpful to you in some way.

    Please consider the advice from other members, as well.

    God Bless :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
    Eggcessive likes this.

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