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Owning pheasants?

Discussion in 'Pheasants and Partridge (Chukar)' started by safarichick101, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. safarichick101

    safarichick101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    College Station TX
    Hi All! I was really stuned by all the gorgeous pheasants in my earlier pheasants. I was just had a few questions regarding pheasant ownership as there is not much available elsewhere.

    1. Are fancy pheasants noisy
    2. Can they be kept in hot climates (East texas - very humid and HOT) provided they have plenty of fresh water and whatever else?
    3. Is their care difficult?
    4. What is a species you recomend most? I am very partial to the goldens..
    5. Are they difficult to rear?
    6. What do they eat?


    Please don't consider this an impulse buy, its just in the back of my head at the moment. Plus, I never buy an animal without doing my hw.


    Thanks,

    Safari [​IMG]
     
  2. chseeads

    chseeads Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 28, 2009
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Overall they're not too noisy. Some species may be more than others though. I have limited experience in that regard.

    Speaking from my silvers though, there are some loud squeals they make, but they don't do that often. Most of the noises they make are little humming sounds and peeps and such that are not loud.

    Some are better suited to hot areas than others.... I'm sure some of the other pheasant people on here will be along with more info in this regard.

    They're not particularly hard to care for. Different kinds might have a few unique quirks, but overall no more difficult in general than any other poultry, etc., in my opinion.

    I haven't had any goldens, but I read a lot of people on here saying that goldens are one of the best for a beginner.

    Gamebird food with higher protein levels. I mix a little corn and a dab of oats in with mine too.
     
  3. safarichick101

    safarichick101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    College Station TX
    Will any pheasant people please reply? That would be great, thanks!
     
  4. DMFarm

    DMFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Winona Tx
    Safari
    The goldens are some of the best to start out with they are easy to raise and are cheep in price. We raise alot of different kinds of pheasants and some do better than others some can't take the hot climate we have here. We feed a 20% protein layer feed to all of our birds. What kind did you want to raise ?
    Doug
     
  5. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    Hahira, GA
    I agree with Doug there,
    Gold, amherst, silvers, and reeves, are the best starter pheasants. They handle most extremes of climate, are relatively easy to care for and rear and eat about anything.
    On the other hand, the bulk of all the others, are very difficult and do require experience and knowledge of each individual species to be cared for properly, these are the expensive and sensitive ones (for a reason too I might add). Some, like the impeyans and tragopans do not like hot humid climates, but can be kept there with care. Others are opposite, like the various peacock pheasants, they hate the cold and like the steam. Many are extreme diggers like the impeyans and various earded pheasants. Some like the tragopans like to be areal nesters. Some, many actually are very aggressive, some to you, some towards their mates. This is where knowledge of the species comes in, with these, it is imperative that you provide large pens with lots of thick cover for the hens to hide in, otherwise you'll end up with dead or scalped hens.Also, some do great with multiple hens, some you have to run just in pairs as the hens will fight each other on. In all cases, 1 male to the pen, best to have dividers between pens so males cant see each other too.
    Definitely try them though, you'll love them I assure you, put do start with the easy , more common species and work your way up, if you decide too. We can get more species specific if you'll give us an idea of the ones you'd like to focus on.
    The gold (and amherst) you mentioned, and great, very beautiful, fairly docile, cane have 6 or more hens to a male, I prefer 4 to keep fertility higher.
    These do take 2 years for the males to color out though. They do have a very loud sharp screech when courting, not very often though and nothing like a crow or gobble either. They are heavy layers, 40 eggs per adult hen if fairly common threw a season.
    They dont take a very large pen, a 10x10 will do a trio easily....

    Hope this has helped you,
    Aubrey
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010
  6. Tony K T

    Tony K T Overrun With Chickens

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    New Hampshire
    Hi Doug,
    Do you have an extra brown eared male?How about an eliot hen?
    In N.H.,Tony.
    Quote:
     
  7. DMFarm

    DMFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tony
    Sold all the brown ears I hatch last year I have a 09 elliott hen I holding for a guy if he don't get it I will sell her. I want be hatching anything out this year we are going to take the year off.
    Doug
     
  8. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    I know this is off topic, but Doug, did you ever get rid of all your 09 bronze white eyes?
     
  9. safarichick101

    safarichick101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    College Station TX
    I really like the goldens as well as amherst and elliots. Those are my favorites. But I do like the silvers and reeves, but I have heard those 2 get aggressive when the males mature. So thats what I have heard.
     
  10. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    your top 3 are great all around birds. Fairly gentle can be run with multiple hens. I have only run elliots in trios, but had no problems with them.
    The silvers and reeves can be run with multiple hens too and is best actually , it takes the males focus off of just 1 hens so he is less likely to kill her. The silvers can be aggressive, but usually just to the hens, not you. I've had tons of them and never been challenged by one. EVERY reeves I've had has tried me at least once, so do watch them if you get them....
     

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