Oxine on Cornish Cross

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by MamaHumbird, Dec 29, 2010.

  1. MamaHumbird

    MamaHumbird Out Of The Brooder

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    This is my first posting but I have been reading this forum for months. I had noticed a few of our laying hens "coughing" and read alot of posts about oxine. It just came in the mail today so I sprayed it in their coop and on the birds themselves. I haven't noticed any symptoms except the "coughing". I did seperate one hen because she seemed worse, her eyes were closed and she just stood there. I have a pen next to the layers that has over 40 9 week old cornish cross. Does anyone know if there would be any harm in spraying them as well, just in case? We are going to try to butcher them in the next few days, weather permitting. I just wanted to make sure since we were so close to butchering them. Thank you!
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not intended to be sprayed on birds or other animals, only environmental surfaces.
     
  3. marquisella

    marquisella Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is copied from the website of Shagbark bantams. He talks about using Oxine for poultry.

    " I first introduced Oxine as a medicinal treatment for upper respiratory fungal infections, as outlined in the first article I ever wrote for the Poultry Press. Oxine was certainly not anything new at that time, but it was new information to most of the fancy. It had already been used for decades in both the chlorination of municipal drinking water supplies, and was widely used throughout the commercial poultry industry. But few fanciers knew anything about it. I happened to have a duck at the time that was suffering so severely from a respiratory infection that I spoke to a Poultry Research Veterinarian friend of mine about possible treatment experiments, since illnesses such as Aspergillosis were thought of as fatal if severe. He told me about Oxine AH and how successful it had been when used as a nebulizing agent both in poultry and in the equine field. (Nebulizing meant the bird had to breathe the product into its airways.)

    I had nothing to lose since the duck could barely breathe, so I tried it. I used a Tri-Jet fogger and a solution of 6-1/2 ounces of Oxine to a gallon of water as prescribed, and I ‘fogged’ the bird’s face and cage three times daily for ten days. She was cured."

    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/contents.htm

    This is the website.

    I once tried it on a rooster that was seemingly near deaths door, hardly able to breath. I treated him for 2 days by using a spray bottle, and spraying the oxine mixture into his face so he had to inhale some of the mist. He recovered miraculaslly.

    As an aside, when I go to a show, I take the oxine mixture in a spray bottle and spray the cages before I put my birds in them. And then, once a day for the duration of the show.

    Sue
     
  4. MamaHumbird

    MamaHumbird Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for the information. The one I seperated seems to be getting a lot better and I am not noticing any symptoms in the other birds. I sprayed it in her face and around her little cage. She is eating & drinking fine and her eyes are open. I just wish you could buy the oxine locally, it would save a lot on the shipping costs.
     
  5. marquisella

    marquisella Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:What I do, if possible, is when I know there is a local show that has vendors, I contact them ahead of time, and buy the Oxine over the internet or phone, then they bring it to the show, so I don't have to pay shipping.

    I do that with eggcartons.com. They are very willing to do it. I can't imagine other vendors wouldn't do it as well.

    Sue
     

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