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Paddocking in woods with 2-3 electric wire fence?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by heiditam, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. heiditam

    heiditam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi. :) Still researching here. I really really want to free range my girls.

    I live in the city, so I cannot have a roo. :( I plan on getting flighty birds that will scuttle from attacks and have plenty of brush/cover, so hawks should not be an issue. They will have a VERY secure coop at night, so the usual night predators are not an issue...

    what I am worried about is DAYTIME predators. We had game cameras out for a while, and we have foxes. :( And skunks. And plenty of loose cats. We have some rare coyotes.

    Anyhow...I have been reading about paddocks and wire fencing. My husband does not like the idea of visible fencing, and I want the girls to free range in woods, so mowing and maintaining a barrier is something that I don't love... I am thinking a low 2-3 wire fend would work? And not be very visible.

    Thoughts?

    -Does brush/vines short out the low straight wire fencing like it does the mesh?

    -What is a good volt-I want it just low enough to scare off a fox but not high enough to hurt a curious toddler who will likely touch it.

    -anyone have a system like this(wire strung in brushy/woods as opposed to clear pasture)?
     
  2. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    If you are talking about 2 - 3 strands of electric fencing like for livestock, that type of fencing will not keep chickens in or predators out. Electric mesh fence is what you are looking for. And around here wandering dogs and coyotes have figured out how to jump that .
     
  3. heiditam

    heiditam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mostly worried about a fox. I am thinking about a wire fence like the low-to-ground 3-wire fence seen here:
    http://whithammillerloop.wordpress.com/2009/03/28/protect-your-garden-with-an-electric-fence/

    Do you think that would deter a fox?
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I can keep foxes and coyotes both out with three strands with about same reliability as with electrified poultry netting. I also mow strips where predator has a transition to see and smell at same time coming up to fence. Fence out in seamless environment not at effective.

    As Enola noted, birds not contained by fencing alone but if area large enough relative to flock size I have a trick that keeps most inside.

    Do you have a dog?
     
  5. DaveOmak

    DaveOmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
  6. heiditam

    heiditam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ugh-that fox. :( Yeah, a sly one could climb trees and hop right over the fence. :(

    No, we don't have a dog yet.

    If the wire fence is not a good idea, I am back to a closed up coop at night and a portable covered run with skirting during day, but this really limits them to smaller flatter areas. :(
     
  7. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've had my electrified poultry net up going on 4 yrs now, and have not had ONE loss to a ground predator, after the fence was put up. I have fox, They are what led me to getting the fence in the first place, coons, stray dogs that just wander in. Just about everything short of a bear, around here, and that fence works. I seen the video above, and that fence was not electrified. So it doesn't have any bearing at all, on what an electric fence, or netting can do. A fox noses into my fence, and gets a snootfull of over 7000Vs, they change their minds about chicken dinner that day. My birds are out everyday of the year, and the fox sure haven't gone anywhere. I still see them regularly, but as luck would have it, I never have a rifle on me.
     
    Krazyquilts likes this.
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    What I do is not for everyone but if you have the space and allowance for vegetation management beyond simply mowing you can take advantage of natural animal behavior to promote separation of birds and predators.

    First image is satellite view of my 1 acre winter cockyard where about 10 hens are allowed to incubate eggs and rear chicks during the production season. Area approximates a square with boundary defined by 3 strands of hotwire in a lane made by four passes of a lawn mower. Combination of mowed area and fence does better than fence alone.

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    Note heavy vegetation on either side of mowed area. It attracts chickens and causes predators to hesitate as they enter the mowed area. Paths also cut through the heavy vegetation to promote birds using entire area without having to use perimeter as much.


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    Last edited: Aug 21, 2014
    Krazyquilts likes this.
  9. heiditam

    heiditam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is a LONG time-thanks for sharing! :)

    Very very nice-that is an amazing set up. Great visual for how the mowing barrier is done. With my woods, I could use a weed wacker to the same effect I think...:)
     
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    This mess looks a lot different following prescribed burn an some tree management.
     

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