Paint or cover coop interior OSB walls?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Der Alte, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. Der Alte

    Der Alte Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 1, 2008
    Hi,

    I am beginning my first henhouse. I'm converting an 8'x10'
    stick-built wooden shed that sits on a concrete pad.

    The lower part of the interior walls will be 4' high by 8' long, 1/2" thick OSB secured to the existing wall studs. The upper part will be hex chicken wire for ventilation. The shed has a screened window and a louvered, screened vent. I'll frame and panel a fourth wall to allow the front of the shed to be used for access and a bit of storage.

    I will be using a droppings board under the roosts and plan to cover it with vinyl or linoleum for easier cleanup. I thought it might be a good idea to paint the OSB with exterior latex paint or perhaps cover it with vinyl or linoleum for easier maintenance.

    Any advice, yea or nay, would be welcome.

    TIA,

    Der Alte
     
  2. Schroeder

    Schroeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 9, 2008
    Central Indiana
    My Coop
    I used the 4' x 8' sheets of tile board designed for bathrooms. No pattern or texture, just a smooth, white waterproof surface. It is the cheapest of the wallboards available in all the big store hardware stores. I found mine on sale at $8 sheet, but I think typical price is closer to $10. I can't imagine a lower maintenance surface. I guess time will tell.
     
  3. Pullet Pimp

    Pullet Pimp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I covered my walls and ceiling with OSB and painted them with a gloss and semi gloss latex paint. It makes it sooo much easier to clean off the poo and dirt that will get on there. I would avoid the flat paints because they will not scrub as well. Look in the mistints section. I found my paint for $4.00 per gallon and it was regularly $28.00 per gallon paint. It will also seal the wood and last longer and prevent the hens from picking off the particles of wood.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. melleo

    melleo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2008
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    wow Mike
    That' looks like a playhouse or someone's room
    Oh wait it is somebody's room
    Your chickens!!!
    We got damaged sheets of bathroom paneling at Home Depot for 5 dollars apiece They work great

    Melia
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:I am not certain whether I understand correctly, but if you are suggesting having the bottom half of the wall be 'double' with an airspace between the outer siding and the OSB, and the upper half chickenwire instead of the OSB, I'd suggest maybe rethinking that. The open gap will catch all sorts of stuff, and fairly quickly become packed with nasty dust, bedding, feathers, etc that will farm up mice and mold and contribute to rotting your walls.

    If you really want to do it this way, at least close off the top of the opening with horizontal 2x4 between the wall studs.

    It would be quite a lot better, however, to OSB the *entire* inside of the shed. If you are in a cold climate, you may wish to insulate the stud space; otherwise perhaps just leave it air. Then simply cut your vent openings through *both* layers of wall, and close off the gap when you frame in your vent.

    I will be using a droppings board under the roosts and plan to cover it with vinyl or linoleum for easier cleanup.

    THat's a really good plan, it works well for me.

    I thought it might be a good idea to paint the OSB with exterior latex paint or perhaps cover it with vinyl or linoleum for easier maintenance.

    I'd paint it with exterior semigloss (prime well first! and be aware that OSB can use up a lot more paint than a smoother surface will) whether or not you want to cover it with anything else. That will considerably lengthen its lifespan. Otherwise, any dampness will start to mess it up, especially if we're talking dampness trapped between OSB and (say) sheet vinyl.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat

    Any advice, yea or nay, would be welcome.

    TIA,​
     
  6. Pullet Pimp

    Pullet Pimp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ohio
    Thanks Melia I may have went overboard on it a bit [​IMG]

    The OSB I used has a smooth side and a rough side to it and I made sure the smooth side was exposed which made painting easier. As Pat already said OSB is a bit thirsty so plan accordingly.
     
  7. Der Alte

    Der Alte Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 1, 2008
    patand chickens wrote:

    I am not certain whether I understand correctly, but if you are suggesting having the bottom half of the wall be 'double' with an airspace between the outer siding and the OSB, and the upper half chickenwire instead of the OSB, I'd suggest maybe rethinking that. The open gap will catch all sorts of stuff, and fairly quickly become packed with nasty dust, bedding, feathers, etc that will farm up mice and mold and contribute to rotting your walls.

    "If you really want to do it this way, at least close off the top of the opening with horizontal 2x4 between the wall studs.

    "It would be quite a lot better, however, to OSB the *entire* inside of the shed. If you are in a cold climate, you may wish to insulate the stud space; otherwise perhaps just leave it air. Then simply cut your vent openings through *both* layers of wall, and close off the gap when you frame in your vent."

    Thanks, I hadn't considered things building up between the interior OSB and the existing outer wall of the shed. I didn't realize that 4 feet of height would not contain feathers, flying bedding, and the like.

    I'm also glad you mentioned the potential problem of moisture buildup between sheet vinyl and the OSB.

    Info like this is what makes this forum so great.

    Thank you,

    Der Alte
     

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