Pale combs/beaks/legs on pullets and goose

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Shiloh Acres, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. Shiloh Acres

    Shiloh Acres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello all! This is my first post here. I've been over on Backyard Herds for a little bit.

    I have searched but not seen a post about this. I have a mixed flock of young chickens. Most came from the same farm with a few from feed stores. All are around 4-1/2 months old. I got them all at several days old. Most unfortunately are turning out to be roosters, LOL. I have RIR, barred rocks, buff orps, black australorps, silver-laced wyandottes, and silkies (gotta have silkies!).

    I've not had many roos in the past, but to me they look fine. Combs deep red and legs a bit yellowish, or blackish gray (depending on breed). What I find concerning is that the pullets look washed out to me. Feather color is good, but most of their legs are very pale barely yellow and the combs just barely pink.

    I also have a small flock of Embden geese that are about 9 weeks old, and one of the females has always had a distinctly pink beak and legs/feet while the others are orange. They came from Metzer.

    I've not had any health issues with any of the birds. All were fed a chick starter (I think 22%) by Brant grain. I've switched the chickens over to layer crumbles. Everyone free-ranges (geese and chickens not together -- the chickens have a large treed and grassy area and go into the cow pasture behind them and under the rabbit cages while the geese have a large yard of their own and get turned out onto another large pasture with goats and llamas. They SOMEtimes get over or through a fence or gate and mix but not as a rule).

    The chickens get kitchen scraps.

    The geese get a limited amount of starter and mostly graze.

    Everyone's behavior is fine. Nothing else to report. The chickens have yet to lay their first eggs (though I AM anxiously waiting. Both have newly constructed coops/housing. Oh! The house had some rooster pens set up in part of the area where the chickens are now. Not sure how long ago but someone once kept roosters on the property. The neighbors ain't talkin. The area used to be very wet too but we brought in dirt and reworked it all so it's good now and the coop has a dirt floor but is raised about 5" above grade (also let us bury wire fencing under the floor so it worked well).

    I just wonder if I need to worry about some deficiency in my birds? Never saw this before. Thanks for any help!
     
  2. Shiloh Acres

    Shiloh Acres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anyone have any idea? I've searched this site and googled the web and can't find info. Thanks either way -- just thought I'd try once more and hope you don't mind.
     
  3. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think you're fine. I don't know anything about geese, but at 12 weeks most of my young roos are getting quite pink/red in the comb and wattles while the girls don't darken up until they are much closer to point of lay--around 17-22 weeks old depending on the pullet.

    [​IMG]

    EDIT: Sorry , it's late for me and I mis-read the ages, I still wouldn't worry yet though as long as they are acting ok. They'll probably darken up pretty soon as they get ready to start laying. Some of my girls got pretty red in the comb 2-3 weeks before they started laying, but most of them seemed to darken up overnight.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2010
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Without pictures it's hard to say for sure, but if all else appears normal I don't think there is any problem. Probably just genetic traits of those particular birds since they have been like that since the beginning. some chickens have pale legs, and some geese have lighter bills and legs. If they are growing fine and acting fine, they are fine.
     

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