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Paralyzed Leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jflynn253, Aug 24, 2016.

  1. jflynn253

    jflynn253 Just Hatched

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    Aug 24, 2016
    IM new to raising chickens and got them from a friend who recently moved. Before they moved I was working with them so knew a lot to do work them and take care of them, especially these chickens. On mother's day they added4 new chicks to the flock. They were babies so I was new to it all. When they moved the babies were about 4months old (July).
    I have a problem with one of the cickens which is now about 5 months old. One of her legs seems to be locked at the knee joint causing her to hold it in front of her the hold time. It seems that she has power at the hip but can't bend it at the knee therefore cannot tuck it under her. This causes problems for her to get around and therefore she just lays in one spot in the pen.
    The other hens (we have no rosters) eventually picked on her and pecked at her head until they drew blood. She has now been separated from the flock to heal her.
    My question what couldve caused that other than an injury. And is there a way to fix it. Or can I just cut the leg off so she can more around a lot easier on her own, making her a more productive member of the flock. Then being able to reintroduce her to the flock
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC. Amputation of a leg is serious, and should not be done at home. Can you see a vet to find out if it is broken, sprained, or paralyzed? Can she move her toes? Mareks disease can cause paralysis of one or both legs or wings. Do you know if she was vaccinated for Mareks? Sprains or broken legs require rest and confining to a crate or cage with food and water. Keep her with the others if possible.
     
  3. jflynn253

    jflynn253 Just Hatched

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    Aug 24, 2016
    I don't know if she was vaccinated as the previous owner bought the fertilized egg online. It appears she has movement of the leg at the hip just not at the knee joint. I try to move her knee joint and it is stiff as can be. I'm afraid that if I push to much I'll break it.

    How can I find if she can move her toes. I know that's a stupid question.

    As for the vet what does a typical bill run. It just wouldn't seem oat effective for a chicken that isn't egg producing yet.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Vet bills can be expensive, so many of us try to help them ourselves. Stroking her foot pad might get her to move her toes. I would keep her penned in a small area or crate near her food and water. There is a good thread to read called "The great big giant Mareks Faq" with a ton of information, if you go to the search box at the top of this page. Some people make a chicken sling or chair with a hole cut out for droppings to pass through, in order to get their lame chickens upright and to keep them cleaner. If you Google that, you will see many homemade chicken slings. Let us know how she does.
     
  5. jflynn253

    jflynn253 Just Hatched

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    Aug 24, 2016
    I am sad to reply that she has gotten worse with her other leg slowly getting paralyzed. I had to put her down. Thank you everyone for your help
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2016
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I am so sorry for your loss. You are welcome for any advice. A necropsy performed by your state vet (in the US) is a good way to confirm Mareks disease, if that was the cause of death. If you should notice any symptoms in your other chickens, it would be good to confirm that. Buying vaccinated chicks from a hatchery in the future, and keeping them away from any dust, dander, or previously used equipment for 2-3 weeks to develop full immunity is a good way to help prevent new chickens from getting it. The disease will remain in your environment for months to years, and for that time, any chickens exposed will be carriers, although vaccinated chicks should not get the disease if they are fully immune.
     

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