Parasites?!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by RiverBendPol, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. RiverBendPol

    RiverBendPol Out Of The Brooder

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    May 16, 2009
    I need the wisdom of the BYC sages! I have a small flock, 3 Buff Orps and 2 Silver Wyandotts. They are not my problem this time. :)
    I also have 3 equines. I also have about 60 acres of hay fields. Getting closer to the problem-bear with me. Every Fall, I spread chicken poo from a local farm all over my fields, in place of chemical fertilizers. The neighbors are very tolerant of the air pollution. With luck, I time it just before a soaking rain so the air isn't foul for too long. So, each Spring and Fall I do fecal tests on my horses to check for internal parasites. Every Spring, they are clean as whistles. Every Fall, they are loaded with worms-Strongyles and Tapes. Do you guys know if the chicken poo from the huge chicken farm could be the parasite carrier? I just can't make sense of it. My barn and paddocks are clean. The horses do not graze in the hay fields but I do ride in them. We could be bringing the chicken poo back to the barnyard in my horses' feet. IF you think Strongyles and Tapes can be carried by chickens then I'll quit spreading the stuff in the fields. Sheesh, last year we had to dig a whole new well bc the chicken spreading polluted our well. This year maybe it has polluted my horses?? Thanks so much!!
    RBP
     
  2. litmisredneck

    litmisredneck Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 4, 2012
    Pierson Fl
    Bump....... Not sure, but it very well could be likely.
     
  3. Stewzoo

    Stewzoo Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 7, 2012
    Most parasites are species specific. Meaning the horses shouldn't be picking up parasites from chickens.

    With that said, parasites can live in the soil for a VERY long time, dormant. Most are spread through fecal/oral consumption. But sometimes the parasites are dormant in the animals system and can be triggered by many things. Stress & weather changes are examples.

    Your best bet would to do preventative deworming on your horses at least 2 times a year.
     

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